Cover image for Repetitive strain injury : a computer user's guide
Title:
Repetitive strain injury : a computer user's guide
Author:
Pascarelli, Emil F., 1930-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : J. Wiley, [1994]

©1994
Physical Description:
xviii, 218 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Contents:
What you should know about RSI -- RSI: a preventable tragedy -- Commonsense approach to RSI: the seven point program -- Symptoms of RSI -- Assessing your risk for RSI -- Diagnosis and treatment of RSI -- Getting an accurate diagnosis -- Classifications of repetitive strain injury -- RSI examination -- Treatment options for RSI -- Computer vision -- Road to recovery -- Beginning the healing process with physical and occupational therapy -- Self care: taking charge of your recovery -- Activities of daily living -- Your emotions -- Maintenance: preventing injury and reinjury -- Back to work: from disability to productivity -- Setting up the workstation -- Typing technique retraining for computer athletes -- Preventing RSI: the big picture -- Legal issues -- Protecting your legal rights if you have job related RSI.
ISBN:
9780471595328

9780471595335
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

A unique Seven-Point Program for the prevention and treatment of this progressive disease, consisting of rules for good postural alignment, exercises, pacing and managing pain. Will help people avoid injury altogether or aid them in their recovery process. All techniques described are inexpensive, effective, non-invasive and do not require the purchase of expensive special equipment. Includes helpful information on setting up a workstation, buying the right type of chair and selecting the correct keyboard.


Summary

Repetitive Strain Injury "A wealth of information for people who have repetitive strain injury, for those who want to prevent it, and especially for those who think it doesn't concern them. Every computer user has the potential for repetitive strain injury and should heed the advice in this book." -Caroline Rose, Editor The RSI Network "This is the most useful book I have seen for RSI sufferers. It is refreshing to read a book that takes these injuries seriously and offers sound advice." -Robert Dieterich, Managing Editor VDT News "Easy-to-read, expertly illustrated, and filled with hundreds of commonsense explanations and practical suggestions for those suffering from all types of repetitive strain injuries. Particularly outstanding is Dr. Pascarelli's sensitivity to the impact of emotional distress and fear on physical well-being and recovery." -Stewart Leavitt, PhD Office of Ergonomics Researchers Leavitt Medical Communications The great speed, ease, and efficiency of personal computers can lead to severe physical and emotional pain. The problem is called "Repetitive Strain Injury," or RSI, and includes a wide range of conditions-from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome to Tenosynovitis. Over time, this "epidemic of the '90s" damages the muscles, nerves, and tendons of the hands, wrists, and arms. Dr. Pascarelli's seven-point plan offers proven ways of preventing the onset of RSI as well as tested methods that will help RSI sufferers to once again lead healthy, productive, and pain-free lives.


Author Notes

EMIL F. PASCARELLI, MD, is an Attending Physician at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, practices as a consultant in cumulative trauma disorders at Columbia-Presbyterian Eastside, and is Director of Ambulatory Care at St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. He is also the founder and Medical Director of the Miller Institute for Performing Artists, Professor of Clinical Medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and Associate Professor of Clinical Public Health at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. DEBORAH QUILTER is a veteran health writer who has contributed to the Columbia Journalism Review, The New York Daily News, Woman's World, and San Francisco Focus, among others.


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

In this highly instructive and readable guide to health in the age of computers, Pascarelli, professor of clinical medicine at Columbia University and Cornell Medical Center, and Quilter, a health writer, explore the causes, symptoms and treatments of varied injuries stemming from prolonged computer keyboard work. RSI (repetitive strain injury) is the authors' catchword for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, tendinitis, epycondylitis (also called tennis elbow) and a slew of other potentially chronic conditions that render not just computer work but also driving, washing dishes, holding a phone and opening a book difficult, if not agonizing. The authors identify the factors contributing to RSI; emphasize preventive measures, such as upper-body exercises, stretches and the pacing of keyboard work; and insist that finding the right professional diagnosis and treatment is the basis for recovery. They also include names of RSI support groups, ergonomic catalogues and on-line newsgroups. Each chapter offers personal exercises and checklists along with countless anecdotes from commiserating RSI sufferers. If some readers find this work somewhat repetitive and alarmist--all too ready to proclaim RSI ``the occupational epidemic of the '90s'' and to attribute it to overly demanding office productivity standards--most will find it a consoling trove of practical advice. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Repetitive strain injury (RSI), the occupational disease of the 1990s, accounts for more than half of all workplace illnesses and costs businesses billions of dollars annually. RSI affects the muscles, nerves, and tendons of the hands, wrists, and arms. It starts at the keyboard of the personal computer and stems from prolonged repetitive, forceful hand movements, poor posture, ill-designed furniture and equipment, and the pressure of a heavy workload. To help the lay reader understand this complex disorder, RSI expert Pascarelli has collaborated with health writer and RSI victim Quilter to write a self-help guide for computer users and employers, describing the variable symptoms of RSI as well as treatment options and prevention. Techniques include maintaining good posture, pacing, exercises, and pain management. Containing useful illustrations, reference notes, and a directory of resources, this is a welcome addition to the growing literature on work-related arm problems. Recommended for public, academic, business, and medical libraries.-- Nancy Chipman-Shlaes, Governors State Univ., University Park, Ill. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this highly instructive and readable guide to health in the age of computers, Pascarelli, professor of clinical medicine at Columbia University and Cornell Medical Center, and Quilter, a health writer, explore the causes, symptoms and treatments of varied injuries stemming from prolonged computer keyboard work. RSI (repetitive strain injury) is the authors' catchword for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, tendinitis, epycondylitis (also called tennis elbow) and a slew of other potentially chronic conditions that render not just computer work but also driving, washing dishes, holding a phone and opening a book difficult, if not agonizing. The authors identify the factors contributing to RSI; emphasize preventive measures, such as upper-body exercises, stretches and the pacing of keyboard work; and insist that finding the right professional diagnosis and treatment is the basis for recovery. They also include names of RSI support groups, ergonomic catalogues and on-line newsgroups. Each chapter offers personal exercises and checklists along with countless anecdotes from commiserating RSI sufferers. If some readers find this work somewhat repetitive and alarmist--all too ready to proclaim RSI ``the occupational epidemic of the '90s'' and to attribute it to overly demanding office productivity standards--most will find it a consoling trove of practical advice. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Repetitive strain injury (RSI), the occupational disease of the 1990s, accounts for more than half of all workplace illnesses and costs businesses billions of dollars annually. RSI affects the muscles, nerves, and tendons of the hands, wrists, and arms. It starts at the keyboard of the personal computer and stems from prolonged repetitive, forceful hand movements, poor posture, ill-designed furniture and equipment, and the pressure of a heavy workload. To help the lay reader understand this complex disorder, RSI expert Pascarelli has collaborated with health writer and RSI victim Quilter to write a self-help guide for computer users and employers, describing the variable symptoms of RSI as well as treatment options and prevention. Techniques include maintaining good posture, pacing, exercises, and pain management. Containing useful illustrations, reference notes, and a directory of resources, this is a welcome addition to the growing literature on work-related arm problems. Recommended for public, academic, business, and medical libraries.-- Nancy Chipman-Shlaes, Governors State Univ., University Park, Ill. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.