Cover image for Puss in boots = El gato con botas
Title:
Puss in boots = El gato con botas
Author:
Boada, Francesc.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Gat amb botes. English & Spanish.
Publication Information:
San Francisco, Calif. : Chronicle Books, 2004.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 22 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780811839235

9780811839242
Format :
Book

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J SPA PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Foreign Language
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Summary

Summary

Retold in both Spanish and English, the universally loved story Puss in Boots will delight early readers and older learners alike. The striking illustrations give a new look to this classic tale, and the bilingual text makes it perfect for both home and classroom libraries.


Author Notes

Charles Perrault was born in Paris on January 12, 1628. He was the son of an upper-class burgeois family and attended the best schools, becoming a lawyer in 1651. After being a lawyer for some time, he was appointed chief clerk in the king's building, superintendent's office in 1664. While there, he induced Colbert to establish a fund called Liste des Bienfaits du Roi, to give pensions to writers and savants not only in France but in Europe. He took part in the creation of the Academy of Sciences as well as the restoration of the Academy of Painting. When the Academy of Inscriptions and Belles-Lettres was founded by Colbert in 1663, Perrault was made secretary for life. Having written but a few popular poems, he was elected to the French Academy in 1671, and on the day of his inauguration he invited the public to be admitted to the meeting, a privilege that has ever since been continued.

Perrault laid the foundations for a new literary genre, the fairy tale, with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales. The best known of his tales include Le Petit Chaperon rouge (Little Red Riding Hood), Cendrillon (Cinderella), Le Chat Botté (Puss in Boots), La Belle au bois dormant (The Sleeping Beauty) and La Barbe bleue (Bluebeard). His stories continue to be printed and have been adapted to opera, ballet (for example, Tchaikovsky's Sleeping Beauty), theatre, and film. He also wrote Parallèles des Anciens et des Modernes (the Parallels between the Ancients and the Moderns), from 1688 to 1697, which compared the authors of antiquity unfavorably to more modern writers, and caused a debate that lasted for years.

Charles Perrault died on May 16, 1703.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Two fairy tales retellings add to an established bilingual series: Thumbelina/Pulgarcita by Caterina Valriu, illus. by Max, which follows the big adventures of the diminutive girl accompanied by Spanish artist Max's black-outlined, poster-like illustrations, and Puss in Boots/El gato con botas by Francesc Boada, illus. by Jose Luis Merino, starring the resourceful feline who helps his master impress the king and wed a princess; Merino's illustrations utilize earth-toned colors and light spongy and streaky textures. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-These adaptations of beloved fairy tales do justice to the originals, in a lighthearted, tongue-in-cheek way. The English-language renditions retain the familiar wording of most traditional editions, and the Spanish, while following the English closely, has its own style and swing. However, it's the illustrations that lift these titles above the "just another version" category. Merino's attractive and animated cartoons, done in ink and watercolor, present a Marquis of Carabas who is perpetually befuddled by the actions of his cat, who sports perhaps the most dynamic feather ever to grace a hat. Superb use of white space and an informed use of warm colors make this simple presentation irresistible. Max has produced humorous, clear cartoon illustrations for Pulgarcita. Rendered in a limited palette (mauve, orange, green, blue, and brown), the round-headed, pointy-nosed characters appear perpetually surprised, and the result is a Thumbelina who is an alert, curious heroine rather than a pawn of fate. These titles will hold their own against such standards as Malcolm Arthur and Fred Marcellino's lush Puss in Boots (Farrar, 1990) or Amy Ehrlich and Susan Jeffers's traditional presentation of Thumbelina (Dial, 1979; o.p.). Excellent additions for either bilingual collections or folktale sections in need of contrasting artistic renderings of two perennial favorites. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.