Cover image for Using open source systems for digital libraries
Title:
Using open source systems for digital libraries
Author:
Rhyno, Art.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Westport, Conn. : Libraries Unlimited, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
xvi, 160 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781591580652
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Designed to ease the process of matching the community with the best content possible, this book provides a starting point for key technologies and the associated tools that make them usable. Introducing the concept of the digital library, Rhyno details the open source tools that are instrumental in developing many of the digital libraries in today's institutions, both from an introductory technical perspective and from the vantage point of the emerging community of users that is erecting the digital library.

In a world of global networks and Internet time, digital libraries are becoming increasingly important in offering flexible, high-quality, and up-to-date resources to your patrons. Designed to ease the process of matching the community with the best content possible, this book provides a starting point for key technologies and the associated tools that make them usable. Introducing the concept of the digital library, Rhyno details the open source tools that are instrumental in developing many of the digital libraries in today's institutions, both from an introductory technical perspective and from the vantage point of the emerging community of users that is erecting the digital library.

Rhyno gives special emphasis to the natural synergy between libraries and the Open Source movement, both of which are widely available to a community of users on a non-profit, publicly funded basis. The Internet itself is largely built on Open Source software, including the Sendmail mail server and the software that runs the Domain Name System (DNS), which locates network addresses. Standards, the centrality of XML, scripting languages, SQL databases, and network servers are all treated. Detailed information is provided for specific technologies and tools that can be fully utilized for servicing a digital collection. This book is essential in helping you navigate the maze of open source solutions as you develop and implement a digital library in your institution.


Author Notes

ART RHYNO received his graduate degree from the University of Western Ontario and is currently Head of the Systems Department of Leddy Library at the University of Windsor. He is widely published in the library literature and active in the standards work particularly in the pen systems movement.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

This book was designed as a practical guide for readers wishing to build digital libraries through OSS (open source software--software that includes source code and a license governing use and distribution). Throughout 10 chapters, the author discusses key technologies underlying digital libraries and examines tools associated with them, treating topics as varied as XML, metadata, protocols, OSS authoring tools, OS relational databases, scripting languages, and regular expressions, just to name a few. Text is enhanced by a copious number of tables, figures, examples, and notes. A glossary, index, and Web site for the book round out the book's offerings. The author does an admirable job of tackling this technical subject, and he presents it in a logical and progressive way. Despite these efforts, however, general readers may still struggle, finding the material impenetrable. Recommended for readers with considerable technical background and knowledge. -- RBB Copyright 2004 Booklist


Table of Contents

Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. xi
Chapter 1 Scoping Out Content for Digital Libraries: A Tale of Documents, Multimedia, and Metadatap. 1
Understanding Differences in Digital Objectsp. 1
The Role of XMLp. 4
Fast-Forward to the Webp. 5
XML: HTML-Plus or SGML-Lite?p. 6
Metadata and Access Levelsp. 8
XML + Metadata = The Semantic Web?p. 12
TAP and Topic Mapsp. 14
Putting It All Togetherp. 16
Chapter 2 Important Protocols for Digital Libraries and OSS Options for Using Themp. 17
HTTPp. 18
Retaining State Informationp. 21
The Ubiquitous Nature of HTTPp. 23
OSS HTTP Software: Apachep. 25
OSS HTTP Software: AOLServerp. 26
OAI-PMHp. 26
OSS OAI Software: Complete Systemsp. 28
Z39.50p. 29
Other Protocols for DLsp. 31
RSSp. 32
Shibbolethp. 34
Putting It All Togetherp. 35
Chapter 3 OSS Authoring Tools for Digital Librariesp. 37
Image Toolsp. 37
Other Mediap. 40
XML Editorsp. 42
Putting It All Togetherp. 46
Chapter 4 OSS Tools for Manipulating and Transforming XMLp. 47
XSLT and XSLT Processorsp. 47
When CSS Is Not Enoughp. 49
Sorting Out XSLTp. 51
About Directory Structuresp. 56
Putting It All Togetherp. 56
Chapter 5 Open Source Relational Databases for Digital Librariesp. 59
Standard Query Language (SQL)p. 61
MySQLp. 62
Other OSS Relational Databasesp. 66
Putting It All Togetherp. 66
Chapter 6 Object and XML Databasesp. 69
Zopep. 70
Using XML in Zopep. 71
Using Zope for XML Searchingp. 73
Xindicep. 75
Other OSS Object/XML Databasesp. 76
Putting It All Togetherp. 76
Chapter 7 Built to Order: DL-Specific Systemsp. 79
@dlboxp. 80
DL Generatorp. 81
Fedorap. 82
Greenstonep. 83
SiteSearchp. 84
Putting It All Togetherp. 85
Chapter 8 Scripting Languages and Regular Expressionsp. 87
The Role of Scripting Languagesp. 88
Perlp. 89
PHPp. 90
Pythonp. 91
Scripting Digital Librariesp. 91
Regular Expressionsp. 92
Scripting + Regular Expressions = Extreme Programming Powerp. 94
A Final Word about XMLp. 96
Putting It All Togetherp. 97
Chapter 9 Plugging Digital Libraries into the Mainstreamp. 99
Loosely Coupled versus Highly Coupledp. 101
XML Integration of Components Using REST and Web Servicesp. 102
Understanding WSDLp. 104
A Quick Look at UDDIp. 106
Cocoon and XSLT as Component Equalizersp. 108
Putting It All Togetherp. 111
Chapter 10 Long-Term Care and Feeding of Digital Librariesp. 113
The Digital Library as Place and Spacep. 113
Preserving and Future-Proofing Collectionsp. 116
The Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS)p. 117
Project Proposals and Reportsp. 119
Measuring Use and Soliciting User Feedbackp. 119
Metrics for Successp. 120
Putting It All Togetherp. 120
Appendixp. 121
Notesp. 123
Glossaryp. 135
Further Resources: Digital Library and Open Source Resources on the Webp. 145
Indexp. 157