Cover image for The frozen tundra : a web of life
Title:
The frozen tundra : a web of life
Author:
Johansson, Philip.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Berkeley Heights, NJ : Enslow Publishers, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Learning the bear facts -- The tundra biome -- Biome communities -- Tundra plants -- Tundra animals.
ISBN:
9780766021761
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
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Status
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QH541.5.T8 J63 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH541.5.T8 J63 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH541.5.T8 J63 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH541.5.T8 J63 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH541.5.T8 J63 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Why do reindeer have such large antlers? Why do some polar bears like to wrestle with each other? How can anything live on land that is frozen most of the year? The answers to all of these questions can be found in the tundra. Here, among the ice, wind, and snow, a very special group of plants and animals have made their home. THE FROZEN TUNDRA: A WEB OF LIFE will show you how everything--from the smallest insect to the tallest tree--works together to make a biome.


Author Notes

Philip Johansson is a writer, educator, and naturalist living in the Northeast. He writes articles on science, medicine, and natural history for national magazines and newspapers. He is currently senior editor at the Earthwatch Institute


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Reviewed with Phillip Johansson's The Temperate Forest0 . Gr. 3-5. Two volumes from the World of Biomes series. Opening with scientists observing polar bears in Manitoba, Tundra0 describes the climate, seasons, plants, and animals of the "frozen desert." Similarly, Temperate Forest0 begins with a biologist trapping, studying, and releasing a black bear in North Carolina and then looking at the defining features of the biome. Each book includes a good map and many excellent color photos, though the use of patterned backgrounds and borders gives the pages a rather busy look and occasionally makes the print more difficult to read. Though there are no easy-to-copy, specific "food webs" here, each book includes a more general illustrated chart for its biome. "Some Plants and Animals in the Tundra Food Web," for example, lists five plants, eight herbivores, and five carnivores but does not specify whether snowy owls feed on musk oxen, lemmings, or insects. Both books provide good, simple discussions of the flow of energy from the sun and soil to plants, then on to herbivores, carnivores and omnivores, decomposers, and back into the soil. A glossary and brief lists of recommended books and Web sites are appended to each book. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2004 Booklist


Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Learning the Bear Factsp. 5
Chapter 2 The Tundra Biomep. 11
Chapter 3 Biome Communitiesp. 19
Chapter 4 Tundra Plantsp. 24
Chapter 5 Tundra Animalsp. 32
Words to Knowp. 45
Learn More (Books and Internet Addresses)p. 47
Indexp. 48