Cover image for One some many
Title:
One some many
Author:
Jocelyn, Marthe.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Toronto : Tundra Books, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
26 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780887766756
Format :
Book

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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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Summary

Summary

One Some Many by Marthe Jocelyn and Tom Slaughter is an excellent early introduction to numbers and to the principles of modern art. It is the perfect companion to 1 2 3, a counting book with a difference. Slaughter's bold, Matisse-inspired paper cuts illustrate basic artistic elements, including color, form, and line, while the playful and inventive text introduces the concepts of quantity that children find most puzzling (and that adults have the most difficulty explaining!). After all, how many is many? Some? A few?


Author Notes

Marthe Jocelyn is an award-winning author and illustrator who worked for many years as a toy designer before turning her hand to writing. Her picture book, Hannah's Collections, was shortlisted for a Governor General's Literary Award for illustration. She has written five novels for older readers, including Mable Riley, which will also release this Spring.

Tom Slaughter 's art has been exhibited in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Japan. His prints are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum. His first book, 1 2 3: A Counting Book was published to critical acclaim in the Fall of 2003. One Some Many is his second picture book.

Marthe Jocelyn and Tom Slaughter are married and divide their time between Stratford, Ontario and New York City. They have two daughters. One Some Many is their first collaboration.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-K. Artist Tom Slaughter, whose first book was 1 2 3 (2003), follows up with a picture book written by his wife. The concepts of numbers and counting can be simply presented for preschoolers, but the differences between one, some, and many are more subjective and more difficult to present. This book attempts to get the ideas across through just a few words and stylish, graphic art. The paper-cut collages, reminiscent of artwork by Matisse, are notable for their brilliant colors, clean compositions, and strong, simple forms. One bright yellow pear is shown against a tomato-red background. Turn the page, and several pears almost touching one another appear with the word some. Facing, a green-leaved tree dotted with yellow pear shapes is accompanied by the word many. A handsome way to talk about concepts. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Three concept books with art by Tom Slaughter seem ideally suited to board book editions: 1 2 3; One Some Many and Over Under, the latter two with text by Marthe Jocelyn. PW wrote of the original books, "This trio of books makes learning the basics fun, while also celebrating modern art." (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-This counting book presents the concepts of "some," "many," "few," and "more" through a rhyming text and stunning, boldly colored paper cuts. A listing of the numbers from 1 to 10 is interrupted by phrases such as "two/a few/a few is more than two/a few is three/or four." Slaughter has recycled some of the images he created for 1 2 3 (Tundra, 2003), and the pictures here are once again deceptively simple yet elegant. However, this effort has a more playful mood as the artist visually explains the ideas expressed in the text. For example, on consecutive pages, "one" is depicted as a single pear, "some" by a group of three pears, "many" by a pear tree full of fruit, and "hardly any" by the remains of an eaten pear. (Older students may want to study this title to learn some of the tenets of basic design technique.) A unique concept book that will appeal to young children.-Rachel G. Payne, Brooklyn Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.