Cover image for Daring women of the Civil War
Title:
Daring women of the Civil War
Author:
Ford, Carin T.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Berkeley Heights, NJ : Enslow Publishers, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
48 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
Summary:
An account of the many roles played by women in the American Civil War, both on the battlefield and at home, introducing specific women such as author Louisa May Alcott and Confederate spy Rose O'Neal Greenhow.
Language:
English
Contents:
Women's work-- The home front -- Nurses -- Soldiers -- Spies.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.9 1.0 80342.
ISBN:
9780766022508
Format :
Book

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E628 .F67 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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E628 .F67 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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E628 .F67 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

An account of the many roles played by women in the American Civil War, both on the battlefield and at home, introducing specific women such as author Louisa May Alcott and Confederate spy Rose O'Neal Greenhow.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Reviewed with Carin T. Ford's Slavery and the Underground Railroad0 . Gr. 3-5. Titles in the new Civil War Library series are not segments of a chronological account of the war, as are some multivolume military histories, but rather accessible, stand-alone discussions of individual topics. Daring Women 0 introduces Rosie the Riveter's predecessors from both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line. Slavery and the Underground Railroad 0 explores the roots of the Civil War, and offers a profusion of true stories about "passengers" and "conductors" on the railroad. Well-chosen, primary-source quotations, culled from a variety of sources, bring the drama up close. There's plenty to gratify a thirst for alluring details (for example, the tale of Henry "Box" Brown, who mailed himself to freedom in a crate), but Ford is equally sensitive to children's need for basic information; statements such as "the Underground Railroad was not underground, and it was not a railroad" perceptively nip confusion in the bud. Compelling archival images illustrate, and thorough chapter notes, a glossary, and suggested print and Internet resources conclude each of these thoughtfully executed volumes. --Jennifer Mattson Copyright 2004 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-The first book begins with a description of women's traditional roles in the United States in the 1800s and highlights several female abolitionists. The changes caused by the Civil War are then enumerated, as women took on the "men's work" at home, held jobs in offices and factories, served as nurses, disguised themselves as soldiers, and even functioned as spies. Many interesting stories are related, from Sarah Rosetta Wakeman disguising herself as an army private to runaway slave Susie King Taylor, who worked as a nurse. The second title explains how slaves were originally brought to the American Colonies and traces the rise and massive growth of slavery. Other chapters cover the daily life of a slave and the plight of runaways. The texts are well organized, contain quotes from primary sources, and present enough information to cover the topics. Unfamiliar terms are explained succinctly and the writing is straightforward. Abundant photographs, reproductions, and sidebars complement the narratives without overwhelming them. Two fine introductions.-Kristen Oravec, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Strongsville, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.