Cover image for A lovely day for Amelia Goose
Title:
A lovely day for Amelia Goose
Author:
Yu, Rong, 1970-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First U.S. edition.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : Candlewick Press, 2004.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 x 26 cm
Summary:
Amelia Goose has a good day playing in the pond with Frog.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.2 0.5 79598.
ISBN:
9780763623098
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Boing! Splash! Sploosh! A warm pond, a good friend, and hours to play -- what could make for a lovelier day? It's a lovely day, and Amelia Goose is off to the pond to play with her friend, Frog. They bounce and splash and play hide-and-seek in the reeds. They sit on the log and swim with the fish. What fun! Yu Rong's bright, graphic images and playful sound words make a satisfying read-aloud for very young children -- and a celebration of simple pleasures with friends.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS. When gosling Amelia wakes up (Good morning, Amelia Goose! ), she heads to the pond, where she and her pal Frog jump and splash and play. Then, thoroughly pleased with the day's activities, she goes home to bed (Good night, Amelia Goose! ). Very young children will be drawn to Rong's toy-box colors and crisply defined, cut-paper shapes, as well as the hand-lettered sound effects: Flip flop flip flop as Amelia strolls hither and thither; Splish splash . . . sploosh! Bubbly bubbly bubbly as she and Frog frolic in the water. Although the straightforward dawn-to-dusk story line aims at babies and toddlers, the onomatopoeia gives this the same read-aloud appeal as books in Jonathan London and Frank Remkiewicz's Froggy series for slightly older children. The artwork would have benefited from more detail (a few strategically placed black lines, for instance, could have defined the webbing in Amelia's curiously blocky feet), but Rong has a strong design sense, grounded in a simplicity that parallels Amelia's enthusiasm for her unremarkable yet wholly satisfying day. --Jennifer Mattson Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Rong's gently arcing, onomatopoeic debut picture book introduces a cheerful white goose. After rising from bed, Amelia Goose heads for the pond, greeting bees and birds along the way. She meets Frog at the pond, and the duo frolic through the marsh, bounding over lily pads ("Boing! Boing! Boing!"), playing hide-and-seek amid cattails and gamboling in the water ("Splish! Splash! Sploosh!"). When "it's time for Amelia Goose to go home," she says goodbye to Frog, then to the birds and bees, and climbs happily into bed. Rong's alabaster cutie leaps out as an immediate focal point in each collage, standing out against the bold, full-bleed backgrounds of blue skies and spring green meadows. One particularly carefree scene shows the goose and frog parading blithely through the water carrying vines (which they later wear as matching necklaces). With no conflict or unpleasantness in this idyllic wetland setting, Rong gives a peaceful account of a simple friendship. Ages 2-5. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-After awakening in her bed, a young goose walks to the pond, greeting bees and birds along the way. She meets Frog and together they bounce on lily pads, play hide-and-seek, swim, and share other games until it is time for Amelia to return home. The vivid collage illustrations reflect the jubilant mood of the two friends as they spend the day together. Bright colors leap off the pages while a very white gosling dazzles the eye. Simple text and hand-lettered onomatopoeic words allow the pictures to take center stage and tell the story. Young children will enjoy observing these two companions who differ in appearance but delight in the same activities.-Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.