Cover image for Is military action justified against nations that support terrorism?
Title:
Is military action justified against nations that support terrorism?
Author:
Torr, James D., 1974-
Publication Information:
San Diego, CA : Greenhaven Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
108 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
The terrorist attacks on America justify the use of military force against states that support terrorism / George W. Bush -- The terrorist attacks on America do not justify the use of military force against states that support terrorism / Larry Mosqueda -- The United States should go to war against nations that support terrorism / Angelo M. Codevilla -- The United States should not go to war against nations that support terrorism / Howard Zinn -- The United States must commit to an ongoing war against terrorism / Alan W. Dowd -- An unconstrained war against terrorism would be unethical and unconstitutional / William Norman Grigg -- A U.S. invasion of Iraq is justified / Frank J. Gaffney Jr. -- A U.S. invasion of Iraq is not justified / Stephen Zunes -- The United States should assassinate some leaders of rogue states and terrorist groups / Richard Lowry -- The United States should not assassinate leaders of rogue states and terrorist groups / Ward Thomas -- The United States should use military force to help foster democracy in the Middle East / Max Boot -- The United States should seek alternatives to military force in responding to terrorism / Craig Eisendrath -- The United States should not use military force to take control of vital resources in the Middle East / John M. Swomley.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780737718331

9780737718324
Format :
Book

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HV6432 .I67 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Perhaps the most controversial issue surrounding terrorism is how governments should respond to it. The viewpoints in this volume discuss the U.S. military intervention in Afghanistan, the Bush administration's case against Iraq, and the broader ethical issues involved in using military force to deter terrorism.


Summary

Perhaps the most controversial issue surrounding terrorism is how governments should respond to it. The viewpoints in this volume discuss the U.S. military intervention in Afghanistan, the Bush administration's case against Iraq, and the broader ethical issues involved in using military force to deter terrorism.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-These concise, debated opinions will help students evaluate America's current response to terrorism. Topics covered include: the U.S.'s use of force against states that support terrorism, the invasion of Iraq, the assassination of leaders of rogue states and terrorist groups, and the use of military force to help foster democracy in the Middle East. The only essay without an opposing viewpoint is the last: "The United States Should Not Use Military Force to Take Control of Vital Resources in the Middle East." Each chapter includes a brief statement identifying the author and an abstract of the article, followed by the full text. Although an introduction to terrorism is provided and some of the articles offer historical background, prior knowledge of the subject would be helpful. A list of related organizations with a brief synopsis of their purpose is included. The Patterns of Global Terrorism (U.S. Dept. of State, 2001) and Eric Hershberg and Kevin W. Moore's Critical Views of September 11: Analyses from around the World (New Press, 2002) will provide students with additional information and opinions on these topics.-Ann Joslin, Erie County Public Library, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-These concise, debated opinions will help students evaluate America's current response to terrorism. Topics covered include: the U.S.'s use of force against states that support terrorism, the invasion of Iraq, the assassination of leaders of rogue states and terrorist groups, and the use of military force to help foster democracy in the Middle East. The only essay without an opposing viewpoint is the last: "The United States Should Not Use Military Force to Take Control of Vital Resources in the Middle East." Each chapter includes a brief statement identifying the author and an abstract of the article, followed by the full text. Although an introduction to terrorism is provided and some of the articles offer historical background, prior knowledge of the subject would be helpful. A list of related organizations with a brief synopsis of their purpose is included. The Patterns of Global Terrorism (U.S. Dept. of State, 2001) and Eric Hershberg and Kevin W. Moore's Critical Views of September 11: Analyses from around the World (New Press, 2002) will provide students with additional information and opinions on these topics.-Ann Joslin, Erie County Public Library, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.