Cover image for Slasher films : an international filmography, 1960 through 2001
Title:
Slasher films : an international filmography, 1960 through 2001
Author:
Armstrong, Kent Byron, 1977-
Publication Information:
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
ix, 366 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Electronic Access:
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip042/2003007620.html
ISBN:
9780786414628
Format :
Book

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PN1995.9.S554 A76 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

The slasher film genre got its start in the early 1960s when acclaimed filmmakers such as Alfred Hitchock and Michael Powell made provocative mainstream film such as Psycho and Peeping Tom, but it is most associated with the late 1970s and the releases of Halloween and Friday the 13th. They have been frightening and thrilling audiences ever since with their bloody scenes and crazed killers. Over 250 slasher films are presented in this work. Entries provide major cast and production credits, a plot synopsis, and a short critique; interesting production notes are often provided. Some of the films covered include Alice, Sweet Alice, American Psycho, The Burning, Cherry Falls, Curtains, Deep Red, Frenzy, Hide and Go Shriek, Maniac, Prom Night, Scream, Sleepaway Camp, Slumber Party Massacre, and The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. Filmographies are provided for slasher directors, actors, writers, and composers.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

According to Armstrong, author of Slasher Films: An International Filmography, 1960-2001, Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film Psycho was the seminal slasher film. The prototype slasher film is defined as one that combines: an introductory murder or predictive event; a setting that does not inspire terror; visualized killings; a human or humanlike killer; systematic, thematic killing; and an unhappy or unresolved ending. Armstrong's well-developed introduction provides examples for each of these elements, and he uses the criteria to select more than 150 representative films, most of them U.S. made. The classics are found (e.g., Scream, Texas Chainsaw Massacre), but lesser-known films are also given good coverage. Entries are arranged alphabetically by English title and vary in length from one to three pages. Information includes date, screenwriters, directors, film company, length, cast, and crew; a very detailed plot outline follows. A final paragraph gives the author's critique of the film's role in the genre. Writing is straightforward and generally objective. A few black-and-white photos provide a sense of the genre. Separate appendixes list slasher directors and screenwriters. The index is minimal. Recommended for libraries with relevant collections. -- RBB Copyright 2004 Booklist


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 1
The Filmsp. 21
Appendix A Slasher Directorsp. 353
Appendix B Slasher Actors and Actressesp. 355
Appendix C Slasher Writersp. 359
Appendix D Slasher Composersp. 361
Indexp. 363