Cover image for African-American religious leaders
Title:
African-American religious leaders
Author:
Aaseng, Nathan.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Facts On File, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
viii, 264 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780816048786
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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BL72 .A27 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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BL72 .A27 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
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Summary

Summary

African-American Religious Leaders profiles many African American religious leaders, from the most famous, Martin Luther King, Elijah Muhammad to others whose influence has been less publicized. Those profiled have been drawn from a vast range of pursuits and include civil rights scions, founders of the African-American churches, compassionate lay leaders, dynamic preachers, pioneers in the ecclesiastical realms previously reserved for whites, workers for social justice, missionaries, and even ordained celebrities from the entertainment world who carry a spiritual message in their interactions with the public. Broad in scope, leaders from a wide variety of faiths and persuasions are covered, including important figures from mainstream Christian denominations, African-American Christian denominations, Islam, Black Muslim, voodoo, and mystic religions.


Author Notes

Nathan Aaseng grew up in Minnesota and worked as a microbiologist for four years before becoming a writer.

He has written over ninety books for young readers, including biographies, and sports and science books.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Facts On File books are generally well researched, well written, and useful for libraries. This new volume in the A to Z of African Americans series is in the same tradition. More than 150 religious leaders are profiled here. Entries are alphabetical ( Abernathy, Ralph to Youngblood,ohnny Ray) and describe each person's early life, family, and involvement in religious and social issues. Most are about one page long and include recent reference books (often Gale titles), periodical articles, and Web sites for further reading. Attractive black-and-white photos illustrate about one-third of the articles. Included are the names you'd expect--Jesseackson, Martin Lutheringr., Elijah Muhammad, Adam Clayton Powellr and Sr.--along with important but lesser-known individuals such as Calvin Butts, Barbara Harris, Ben Chavis, and Lucy Smith. Others not usually thought of as religious leaders, among them George Foreman, Mahaliaackson, Hiram Revels, and Sojourner Truth, are also profiled. Several indexes make it possible to locate individuals by religious affiliation (including nondenominational Cornel West) and year of birth (1737 to 1962) as well as subject (Civil War, Million Man March, Morehouse College). Articles objectively describe even unpleasant events and situations. Some inevitable repetition between articles exists (for example, the 1787 remodeling of St. George's Episcopal Church in Philadelphia to provide separate seating for blacks is described in the entries on both Richard Allen and Absalomones), and of course many of the individuals may be found in other similar titles. Since religious leaders are not commonly studied, this is probably not an essential purchase. It will be useful for high-school collections where brief biographies are well used as well as for public and undergraduate libraries. -- RBB Copyright 2004 Booklist


Choice Review

Aaseng's second work in the "A to Z of African Americans" series provides a valuable collection of biographical sketches about influential African American religious leaders. He profiles more than 150 familiar and lesser-known individuals who were pioneers or trailblazers--past and present founders of African American churches, clergymen, bishops, missionaries, evangelists, denomination leaders, theologians, and ordained entertainers. Each entry lists titles for further reading; some include a photograph. The work also contains a list of entries, a bibliography, a list of entries by religious affiliation, a list of entries by year of birth, and a general index. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General readers of all ages. N. M. Allen University of South Florida at Sarasota/Manatee


Excerpts

Excerpts

Religion and spirituality have been key elements of African-American life since the earliest days of the slave trade, when Negro spiritual songs helped keep alive the flame of human dignity under the most oppressive conditions. For many decades, spiritual convictions were the driving force behind many successful African-American pioneers and were important forces holding families together against the disruptive forces of society. In more recent times, African-American religious leaders directed and inspired the Civil Rights movement and awakened a new sense of identity. African-American Religious Leaders profiles many leaders, from the most famous, such as Martin Luther King Jr., and Elijah Muhammad, to others whose influence has been less publicized. Those profiled have been drawn from a vast range of pursuits and include civil rights activists, founders of the African-American churches, compassionate lay leaders, dynamic preachers, pioneers in the ecclesiastical realms previously reserved for whites, workers for social justice, missionaries, and even ordained celebrities from the entertainment world who carry a spiritual message in their interactions with the public. Broad in scope, leaders from a wide variety of faiths and persuasions are covered, including important figures from mainstream Christian denominations, African-American Christian denominations, Islam, Black Muslim, Voodoo, and mystic religions. An informative and fascinating resource for both serious students and general readers alike, each entry provides a brief biographical sketch of the leader and goes on to address the major achievements, events, and contributions of the leader to his or her followers and society at large. A general bibliography, two subject indexes (one by religious affiliation, one by year of birth), a general index, and approximately 50 black-and-white photographs complement the text. Profiles include: Ralph Abernathy: Baptist clergy, political activist Ben Ami Ben-Israel: founder of the Black Hebrews Father Divine: founder and leader of Peace Mission Thomas Andrew Dorsey: gospel music founder Catherine Williams Ferguson: Sunday School pioneer Barbara Clementine Harris: Episcopalian bishop Martin Luther King Jr.: Baptist clergy, civil rights leader Adam Clayton Powell Jr.: Baptist clergy, politician Mary Magdalena Lewis Tate: Pentecostal leader Charleszette Waddles: visionary, humanitarian Jeremiah Wright Jr.: United Church of Christ clergy, theologian and many others. Excerpted from African-American Religious Leaders by Nathan Aaseng All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.