Cover image for Judy Moody saves the world!
Title:
Judy Moody saves the world!
Author:
McDonald, Megan.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First paperback edition.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : Candlewick Press, 2004.
Physical Description:
144 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
Summary:
When Judy Moody gets serious about protecting the environment, her little brother Stink thinks she is overdoing it, but she manages to inspire her third grade class to undertake an award-winning, environment-saving project.
General Note:
Originally published in hardcover in 2002.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
500 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.6 1.0 62253.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.3 5 Quiz: 30922 Guided reading level: M.
ISBN:
9780763620875
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Get ready, world--Judy is taking over in paperback (ages 6-10)!

It all starts with the Crazy Strip contest -- and the dream that she, Judy Moody, might one day see her very own adhesive-bandage design covering the scraped knees of thousands. But when her "Heal the World" motif merits only an honorable mention, Judy realizes it's time to set her sights on something bigger. Class 3T is studying the environment, and Judy is amazed to learn about the destruction of the rain forest, the endangered species (not) in her own backyard, and her own family's crummy recycling habits. Now she's in a mood to whip the planet into shape -- or her name isn't Judy Monarch Moody!


Author Notes

Megan McDonald was born February 28, 1959, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She grew up in the 1960s the youngest of five girls - which later became the inspiration of the Sister's Club. She attended Oberlin College and received a B.A. in English, then she went on to receive a Library Science degree at Pittsburgh University in 1986. Before becoming a full-time writer, McDonald had a variety of jobs working in libraries, bookstores, museums, and even as a park ranger.She was children's librarian, working at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Minneapolis Public Library and Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. She has received various awards for her storytelling including a Judy Blume Contemporary Fiction Award, a Children's Choice Book award, and a Keystone State Award among others. McDonald has also written many picture books for younger children and continues to write. Her most recent work was the "Julie Albright" series of books for the American public. She currently resides in Sebastopol, California with her husband and pets.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-5. The third title in the Judy Moody series finds the spunky third-grader in a save-the-world mood. Judy would like to enter an adhesive bandage design contest, but she doesn't have any ideas. Then a class environmental preservation project inspires her creativity, as well as a new mission. But it's not long before Judy discovers that saving the world isn't easy, whether she is trying to convince her father not to drink rainforest bean coffee or her mom to dispose of a rubber toilet plunger. However, Judy persists, and while bandage-art fame eludes her, she does come up with a class recycling project that makes a difference. It also puts her in a very good mood. This charming read features characteristically snappy, humorous prose; expressive, witty, black-and-white illustrations; and some great ideas for classroom or home projects. The book stands alone, but fans will enjoy familiar, distinctive characters and references from previous titles. --Shelle Rosenfeld


Publisher's Weekly Review

Inspired by environmental studies in school and a humiliating defeat in a Band-Aid design contest, Judy Moody, in her third adventure, revamps her family's recycling efforts and confiscates her classmates' wooden pencils in Judy Moody Saves the World by Megan McDonald, illus. by Peter Reynolds. The original Judy Moody is now available in paperback; in our Best Books citation, PW said, "It's hard to imagine a mood that Judy couldn't improve." (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Excerpts

Excerpts

A Mr. Rubbish Mood It was still dark out when Judy woke up early the next morning. She found her flashlight and notebook. Then she tiptoed downstairs to the kitchen and started to save the world. She hoped she could save the world before breakfast. Judy wondered if other people making the world a better place had to do it quietly, and in the dark, so their parents would not wake up. She, Judy Moody, was in a Mr. Rubbish Mood. Mr. Rubbish was the Good Garbage Gremlin in Stink's comic book, who built his house out of French-fry cartons and pop bottles. He recycled everything, even lollipop sticks. And he never used anything from the rain forest. Hmm...things that came from the rain forest. That would be a good place to start. Rubber came from the rain forest. And chocolate and spices and things like perfume. Even chewing gum. Judy collected stuff from around the house and piled it on the kitchen table. Chocolate bars, brownie mix, vanilla ice cream. Her dad's coffee beans. The rubber toilet plunger. Gum from Stink's gumball machine. Her mom's lipstick from the bottom of her purse. She was so busy saving the rain forest that she didn't hear her family come into the kitchen. "What in the world...?" Mom said. "Judy, why are you in the dark?" Dad asked, turning on the lights. "Hey, my gumball machine!" Stink said. Judy held out her arms to block the way. "We're not going to use this stuff anymore. It's all from the rain forest," she told them. "Says who?" asked Stink. "Says Mr. Rubbish. And Mr. Todd. They cut down way too many trees to grow coffee and give us makeup and chewing gum. Mr. Todd says the earth is our home. We have to take action to save it. We don't need all this stuff." "I need gum!" yelled Stink. "Give me back my gum!" "Stink! Don't yell. Haven't you ever heard of noise pollution?" "Is my coffee in there?" Dad asked, rubbing his hair. "Judy? Is that ice cream? It's dripping all over the table!" Mom carried the leaky carton over to the sink. "ZZZZ-ZZZZZ!" Judy made the sound of a chain saw cutting down trees. "She's batty," Stink said. Dad put the brownie mix back in the cupboard. Mom took the toilet plunger off the kitchen table and headed for the bathroom. Time for Plan B. Project R.E.C.Y.C.L.E. She, Judy Moody, would show her family just how much they hurt the planet. Every time someone threw something away, she would write it down. She got her notebook and looked in the trash can. She wrote down: 1 orange juice can, 1 inside of peanut butter jar lid, 1 plastic bread bag, 4 broken egg shells, smelly yucky wet coffee grouns, 3 paper muffin holders, 2 smooshed Scarlett O'Cherry juice boxes (and straws!), 1/2 bowl of oatmeal. "Stink! You shouldn't throw gooey old oatmeal in the trash!" Judy said. "Dad! Tell her to quit spying on me!" "I'm a garbage detective!" said Judy. "Garbologist to you. Mr. Todd sais if you want to learn what to recycle, you have to get to know your garbage." "Here," said Stink, sticking something wet and mushy under Judy's nose. "Get to know my apple core." "Hardee har har," said Judy. "Hasn't anybody in this family ever heard of the Three R's?" "The Three R's?" asked Dad. "Re-use. Re-cycle." "What's the third one?" asked Stink. "Re-fuse to talk to little brothers until they quit throwing stuff away." "Mom! I'm not going to stop throwing stuff away just because Judy's having a trash attack." "Look at all this stuff we throw away!" Judy said. "Did you konw that one person throws away more than eight pounds of garbage a day?" "We recycle all our glass and cans," said Mom. "And newspapers," Dad said. "But what about this?" said Judy, picking up a plastic bag out of the trash. This bread bag could be a purse! Or carry a library book!" "What's so great about eggshells?" asked Stink. "And smelly old ground-up coffee?" "You can use them to feed plants. Or make compost." Just then, something caught her eye. A pile of Popsicle sticks? Judy pulled it out. "Hey! My Laura Ingalls Wilder log cabin I made in second grade!" "It looks like a glue museum to me," said Stink. "I'm sorry, Judy," Mom said. "I should have asked first, but we can't save everything, honey." "Recycle it! said Stink. "You could use it for kindling, to start a fire! Or break it down into toothpicks." "Not funny, Stink." "Judy, you're not even ready for school yet. Let's talk about this later," said Dad. "It's time to get dressed." It was no use. Nobody listened to her. Judy trudged upstairs, feeling like a sloth without a tree. . . . Her family sure knew how to ruin a perfectly good Mr. Rubbish mood. She put on her jeans and her Spotted Owl T-shirt. And to save water, she did not brush her teeth. She compled downstairs in a mad-at-your-whole-family mood. "Here's your lunch," said Mom. "Mom! It's in a paper bag!" "What's wrong with that?" Stink asked. "Don't you get it?" said Judy. "They cut down trees to make paper bags. Trees give shade. They help control global warming. We would die without trees. They make oxygen and help take dust and stuff out of the air." "Dust!" said Mom. "Let's talk about cleaniing your room if we're going to talk about dust." "Mo-om!" How was she supposed to do important things like save trees if she couldn't even save her FAMILY tree? JUDY MOODY SAVES THE WORLD by Megan McDonald. Copyright (c) 2002 by Megan McDonald. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA. Excerpted from Judy Moody Saves the World! by Megan McDonald All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.