Cover image for Mom, can I move back in with you? : a survival guide for parents of twentysomethings
Title:
Mom, can I move back in with you? : a survival guide for parents of twentysomethings
Author:
Gordon, Linda Perlman.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Jeremy P. Tarcher, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
276 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781585422906
Format :
Book

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HQ755.86 .G67 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Parenting
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Summary

Summary

The follow-up to the best-selling Quarterlife Crisis addresses the confusion confronting twenty-somethings in the face of unprecedented cultural and social changes and introduces a new set of parenting skills to help parents cope with the tumultuous period in their adult children's lives. Original.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

A better title for this book might have been Helping Your Kids Become Real Adults, as Gordon, a social worker and psychotherapist, and Shaffer, an educator, focus on the changing roles of parents and adult children in the 21st century, with little more than one chapter on what happens when kids move back home. The authors analyze why the lines between adolescence and adulthood are so blurred these days, explaining that the previous markers of adulthood (e.g., career, economic independence, home, marriage, and children) are elusive and delayed for today's twentysomethings. Discussion of how parents must communicate and negotiate follows. But nowhere do the authors deal with the horror of kids on drugs, in trouble with the law, unemployed, or unable to cope. Though much of the text is repetitive, sections dealing with new relationships among siblings are very good, as is the general message to parents to sit back and enjoy their adult children, no matter where they live. Susan Newman's Nobody's Baby Now, written for adult children, approaches similar territory from another perspective. Overall, this book is recommended for public libraries, but those looking for specifics on getting along in a full nest need to get information elsewhere.-Linda Beck, Indian Valley P.L., Telford, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.