Cover image for Flower girl butterflies
Title:
Flower girl butterflies
Author:
Howard, Elizabeth Fitzgerald.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Greenwillow Books, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Sarah is both excited and nervous about being the flower girl in her aunt's wedding.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.9 0.5 78055.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780688178093

9780688178109
Format :
Book

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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Sarah is both excited and nervous about being the flower girl in her aunt's wedding.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. Being a flower girl is both a blessing and a curse. Sarah, a darling African American child, loves her auntudith, but being in her wedding is scary. Twirling around in her new dress is fun and so are the visiting relatives, but Sarah has a whole list of worries: Suppose she forgets to throw the flowers? Maybe her dress will get muddy. When Sarah voices her concerns, her aunt tells her that she'll be sad if Sarah isn't her flower girl. The show goes on, and Sarah's stage fright dissipates as she walks down the aisle. The sentiments expressed in the confessional, free-verse text and in the true-to-life artwork, which uses watercolors, colored pencils, and collage, will capture the hearts of young girls. The vigor of the spreads--the dresses swirling, the madness of wedding day--is juxtaposed with the close-ups of Sarah, worried, ambivalent, and eventually joyful. Gender stereotypes notwithstanding, this is a confection girls will love, laced with honest emotions. For other good books about children's wedding woes see the Read-alikes: Down the Aisle BKL My 1 01. --Ilene Cooper Copyright 2004 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-All of the excitement and anxiety of a wedding day are captured in this charming picture book. When young Sarah is asked to be a flower girl in her Aunt Robin's wedding, the child is consumed with doubts. She worries that she will forget to throw her flowers. She's nervous about tripping in front of everyone, getting sick, or ruining her new dress. With the loving reassurance of her African-American family, she calms her fears enough to walk down the aisle. After all, she has to be a "big girl" role model for the little ring bearer. This book is a wonderful celebration of family as the grandmothers and several uncles and cousins come to spend the night before the wedding at Sarah's house. Sarah's big moment is a perfect splash of pink background and scattered pink petals with the child's dark skin gleaming against her white flower-girl dress. The lovely bride, in a frothy white gown, follows. The collage textures added to the watercolor and colored-pencil illustrations give the book a tactile look. A warm, family-oriented story that children will love.-Janet M. Bair, Trumbull Library, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.