Cover image for Whiskey sour : a Jack Daniels mystery
Title:
Whiskey sour : a Jack Daniels mystery
Author:
Konrath, Joe, 1970-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
270 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9781401300876
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Lieutenant Jacqueline Jack' Daniels is having a bad week. Her live-in boyfriend has left her for his personal trainer, chronic insomnia has caused her to max out her credit cards with late-night home shopping purchases and a frightening killer who calls himself 'The Gingerbread Man' is dumping mutilated bodies in her district. Whiskey Sour is full of laugh-out-loud humour and edge-of-your-seat suspense and it also introduces a fun, fully drawn heroine in the grand tradition of Kinsey Millhone, Stephanie Plum and Kay Scarpetta.'


Author Notes

American mystery/thriller/horror writer Joseph Andrew Konrath was born in 1970 in Skokie, Illinois and graduated in 1992 from Chicago's Columbia College. His first published novel, Whiskey Sour, began the popular series that features Lt. Jacqueline "Jack" Daniels of the Chicago Police Department. Konrath has also written numerous short stories and articles, and his horror work Afraid was published under the pseudonym Jack Kilborn. He has won several literary awards, and his blog A Newbie's Guide to Publishing is very popular.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Except for her name-Jacqueline Daniels (and, yes, she's known by her colleagues at the Chicago Police Department and by her friends as "Jack Daniels")-there's not an original trope in this competent, fast-paced thriller by newcomer Konrath. A lieutenant investigating a particularly gruesome series of homicides, Daniels is like every other hard-boiled fictional cop-obsessed with work, afraid to commit emotionally and overcaffeinated. The other characters also follow formula: her partner is an overweight glutton with a heart of gold; her boss is tough but fair; the federal agents assigned to help her are territorial, superior and ineffectual. And the criminal himself, a serial killer who calls himself the "Gingerbread Man," only differs from others of his ilk in his methodology, not his psychology. He tortures and kills attractive young women, leaving their mutilated bodies in public places. Konrath, who has "performed improvisational comedy" according to his bio, likes to toss off one-liners, and while they're occasionally clever, they lend a jokey tone that jars with the seriousness of the almost gratuitously horrific crimes. Reading like an ill-conceived cross between Carl Hiaasen and Thomas Harris, this cliché-ridden first novel should find a wide audience among less discriminating suspense fans. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

When the body of a young woman is found in a trash can, Lt. Jacqueline "Jack" Daniels, head of the Violent Crimes Unit, is called to the scene. Soon, it is deduced that the Chicago Police Department is dealing with a serial killer who takes great pleasure in slowly torturing and killing young women and then leaving a gingerbread cookie in his wake. As the female officer heading the investigation and a worthy opponent at that Jack becomes an obsession of the Gingerbread Man; her private life takes center stage as he tracks her down. Meanwhile, FBI officials provide some comic relief when they profile the killer as someone fascinated with horses and request Jack's unit to stake out a particular equine. This debut mystery is hard to characterize: the killings are brutal, yet the story is full of humor. In addition, the characters are engaging and human, and there are a lot of details about Jack's miserable love life. Fans of Janet Evanovich will like this, but readers of police procedurals will find fault with the lack of authentic detail (we know more about the serial killer than we do about how the police do their work). For most mystery collections. [Previewed in Mystery Prepub Alert, LJ 4/1/04.] Jo Ann Vicarel, Cleveland Heights-University Heights P.L., OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.