Cover image for Mexico the real Mexico in music and song.
Title:
Mexico the real Mexico in music and song.
Author:
Yurchenco, Henrietta.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Nonesuch, [2003]
Physical Description:
1 audio disc : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Purépecha and mestizo songs.

Originally released in 1966 as Nonesuch H-72009.

Compact disc.

Program notes by Henrietta Yurchenco with partial text translations in English (20 p. : ill.) inserted in container.
Language:
North American Indian (Other)
Contents:
Los tiradores = The wastrels (3:57) -- Male Rosa = Senorita Rosa (1:17) -- Toronjil moradia = The purple toronjil (2:35) -- La visita = The visit (1:43) -- Son del viento = The wind (2:47) -- Fulanita : (Nendiskita) (1:19) -- La magnolia (2:40) -- El toro antejeulo = The spotted bull (2:05) -- El perro = The dog (2:30) -- Flor de canela = Cinnamon flower (1:55) -- Kuinchikua = Fiesta in Uruapan (1:05) -- La reginita = Regina (2:35) -- Son de javalín = The wild boar (2:24) -- Malva rosita = Rose-colored Malva (1:57).
Added Author:
UPC:
075597972429
Format :
Music CD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
FOLKLATA .ZM611 M Compact Disc Central Library
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Billed as the "Real Mexico," this is, in fact the real Michoacán, on the country's west coast, and home to the Purépecha Indians, although the population is really Indian and mestizo these days. And there are actually a small number of artists recorded for this -- but what artists! Las Hermanas Pulido appear on several tracks, three sisters with beautiful sororal harmonies, whether alone or backed by an unnamed mandolin orchestra (which also gets a couple of tracks of its own, with fascinating instrumental takes on a pair of songs, including a very French waltz). Guitarist Joaquin Bautista is a joy, and his playing is so eloquent that he doesn't need vocals, which is also true of blind harpist Teodulo Naranjo, whose playing almost literally sparkles on a couple of sons. The Apatzingán Ensemble are more rough and ready, but equally enjoyable. This is indeed a glimpse of the real Mexico, a world away from mariachi bands and sounds geared to appeal to tourists. But the sheer beauty of much of it is almost overwhelming at times. Fabulous stuff indeed. ~ Chris Nickson