Cover image for A journey into a wetland
Title:
A journey into a wetland
Author:
Johnson, Rebecca L.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : Carolrhoda Books, Inc., [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
48 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Takes readers on a walk in a swamp, showing examples of how the animals and plants of wetlands are connected and dependent on each other and the wetland's watery environment.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781575055930
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
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QH541.5.M3 J64 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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QH541.5.M3 J64 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH541.5.M3 J64 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH541.5.M3 J64 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH541.5.M3 J64 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH541.5.M3 J64 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QH541.5.M3 J64 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Takes readers on a walk in a swamp, showing examples of how the animals and plants of wetlands are connected and dependent on each other and the wetland's watery environment.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Reviewed with Rebecca L. Johnson's A Journey into a Lake0 . Gr. 3-6. With relaxed, clear prose and beautiful color illustrations on every page, these titles in the Biomes of North America series bring close the general facts of the water habitats as well as the details of the individual plants, birds, animals, and insects that make their homes there. "With teeth bared, the mother alligator rushes in to protect her nest," reads the text, accompanied by a big, front-view color photo showing mama in action. Then there's the detail: a small, clear drawing shows the protective membrane covering an alligator's eyeball underwater. The action will draw readers, and so will the dramatic particulars of small things ("Sundews are insect-eating bog plants that trap their prey in drops of sticky goo"). The connections make a vivid environmental story of a community of living things. With a glossary and a bibliography of books and Web sites appended to each volume, these are fine choices for browsing and biology reports. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2004 Booklist