Cover image for From Love Canal to environmental justice : the politics of hazardous waste on the Canada-U.S. border
Title:
From Love Canal to environmental justice : the politics of hazardous waste on the Canada-U.S. border
Author:
Fletcher, Thomas H. (Thomas Hobbs), 1960-
Publication Information:
Peterborough, Ont. : Broadview Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
239 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781551114347
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
TD1045.C2 F54 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...
Searching...
TD1045.C2 F54 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...
Searching...
TD1045.C2 F54 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Tracing the history of environmental policy and politics from the seminal moments of 1978 at Love Canal to current environmental justice disputes, this in-depth study offers a cross-border analysis of the modern environmental movement that should be of interest to students and practitioners, academics and activists. Though no explicit environmental justice movement has developed in Canada, questions of fairness and equity in issues like the recent Toronto garbage crisis are central to many of the country's environmental conflicts. The location of Love Canal and other hazardous waste facilities on the New York-Ontario border allows for striking national comparisons without sacrificing attention to local and regional detail. Just as the issues surrounding Love Canal have shaped environmental management many years after the event, so too the environmental justice movement is making its mark on contemporary policy and politics in ways that we are likely to recognize many years from now.


Author Notes

Thomas H. Fletcher is Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Studies and Geography at Bishop's University, Lennoxville, Quebec and an adjunct professor at l'Universite de Sherbrooke.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

The convergence of social justice and environmental problems led to the 25-year-old environmental justice movement as documented here, with the beginning of the movement dated earlier than usual, from the Love Canal crisis in 1978. Changes in laws and policies are reviewed since then, in a cross-border analysis using Ulrich Beck's concept of a "risk society," summarized as "an age where concerns over the distribution of technological risks are becoming at least as important as concerns over distributions of wealth." Centering on the Canadian-US Great Lakes area, Fletcher (environmental studies and geography, Bishop's Univ., Quebec) examines how the idea of distributive justice has evolved, culminating in the 1999 sharing of the prestigious Heinz Award for the Environment between Love Canal activist Lois Gibbs and Florence Robinson, who in 1998 organized the shutdown of a hazardous waste incinerator in her African American neighborhood in Louisiana. Bolstered by statistics and case studies, Fletcher makes the case that an "industrial ecology" approach is needed to regulate production as well as disposal, but, 25 years later, industries and governments continue to find this idea unrealistic. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels. S. E. Wiegand Saint Mary's College


Table of Contents

Acknowledgementsp. 7
Prefacep. 11
List of Acronymsp. 21
List of Figuresp. 23
List of Tablesp. 25
Introduction: From Toronto to Kirkland Lake?p. 27
Part I Themesp. 35
Chapter 1 Love Canal and Hazardous Waste Policyp. 39
Chapter 2 Environment and Social Justicep. 69
Chapter 3 Environmental Justice and ôIndustrial Ecologyöp. 93
Part II View Pointsp. 123
Chapter 4 The Niagara Regionp. 129
Chapter 5 Detroit and Sarniap. 163
Part III Interpretationsp. 191
Chapter 6 Towards Environmental Justice and Hazardous Wastep. 195
Chapter 7 Conclusionp. 213
Referencesp. 223
Indexp. 237