Cover image for A pocket full of kisses
Title:
A pocket full of kisses
Author:
Penn, Audrey, 1947-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : Child & Family Press, 2004.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
Chester Raccoon is worried that his mother does not have enough love for both him and his new baby brother.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 83532.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780878688944
Format :
Book

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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In this tender sequel to the bestseller and children's classic "The Kissing Hand," Penn provides a heartwarming story, perfect for families who are adjusting to all the changes new members can bring.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. The Kissing Hand (1995), though too sweet for many tastes, has developed such a following that many libraries cannot fill the demand each year before the start of school. This sequel is also quite sweet, but those who love the original may want to read the new story about Chester Raccoon. Now beyond his kindergarten separation anxiety, Chester has a new problem: dealing with his younger brother, who plays with his toys, pulls his tail, follows him around, and even shares his mother's gift of a Kissing Hand (Mom kisses Chester's palm, and Chester can transfer the kiss to his cheek whenever he needs comfort). Chester's mother reassures him that she will never run out of Kissing Hands. In fact, she has a spare for Chester to give his brother when he needs a big brother's care. Teeming with details, Gibson's paintings depict an idyllic woodland populated with friendly beasts, birds, and bugs that seem to pause and take an interest in the raccoons' conversations. The focus of the artwork, as well as the story, is clearly on the loving mother-and-child relationship. Recommended for libraries in which the earlier book has a following. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

When Chester the raccoon was introduced to readers in The Kissing Hand, he was wrestling with the difficult transition of starting school. In this sequel, Chester has another hurdle to overcome: sibling rivalry. It's bad enough that his new brother Ronny is a pest ("He pulls my tail and talks to my friends and follows me everywhere I go!" Chester complains). But the hero is thrown for a loop when he sees Mrs. Raccoon giving Ronny a Kissing Hand-a smooch in the middle of her child's palm, which, as in the first book, sends "the warmth of that kiss [rushing] from his hand, up his arm, and into his heart"-previously reserved just for Chester. "How come you gave the baby my Kissing Hand?" Chester wails. But with his mother's patient reassurance and an analogy borrowed from nature (there will always be enough love to go around, just as the sun never runs out of light), he begins to believe she won't run out. There are certainly more bracing-and less obvious-treatments of this subject. But as the many fans of the original book proved, Penn understands the powerful pull of old-fashioned sentiment; and Gibson's illustrations, more understated than that of the artists' work in the first book, balances the sentimental message with her realistic renderings of nature. The flowery, poignant prose and meticulously detailed, benevolent-looking forest settings seem to spring straight from the heart. Ages 4-8. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-A sequel to Penn's The Kissing Hand (CWLA, 1993). A young raccoon pleads with his mother to "return" his baby brother due to typical sibling offenses. When Chester sees her give little Ronny a "Kissing Hand" (a kiss in the middle of his open palm), the waterworks begin. Of course, Mrs. Raccoon reassures her older son of his continuing importance to her, adding a bonus Kissing Hand for being a big brother. The animals' emotions are clearly expressed in the narrative. Gibson's crisp, realistic paintings are colorful and depict the scenery and activity of the meadow. Although this book is more appealing than the first work, standbys like Ann Herbert Scott's On Mother's Lap (Clarion, 1992) or Kady MacDonald Denton's Would They Love a Lion? (Larousse, 1998) are still better choices.-Gay Lynn Van Vleck, Henrico County Library, Glen Allen, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.