Cover image for Home
Title:
Home
Author:
Baker, Jeannie.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Greenwillow Books, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : Col. illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A wordless picture book that observes the changes in a neighborhood from before a girl is born until she is an adult, as it first decays and then is renewed by the efforts of the residents.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780066239347

9780066239354
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

A family. A house. A neighborhood. A place to play. A place to feel safe. Little by little, baby Tracy grows. She and her neighbors begin to rescue their street. Together, children and adults plant grass and trees and bushes in the empty spaces. They paint murals over old graffiti. They stop the cars. Everything begins to blossom. In Jeannie Baker's striking, natural collages, an urban community reclaims its land. A drab city street becomes a living, thriving neighborhood -- a place to call home.


Summary

A family.
A house.
A neighborhood.
A place to play.
A place to feel safe.

Little by little, baby Tracy grows. She and her neighbors begin to rescue their street. Together, children and adults plant grass and trees and bushes in the empty spaces. They paint murals over old graffiti. They stop the cars. Everything begins to blossom.

In Jeannie Baker's striking, natural collages, an urban community reclaims its land. A drab city street becomes a living, thriving neighborhood -- a place to call home.


Author Notes

Jeannie Baker was born in England and moved to Australia. She studied art and design in England. Her illustrations have appeared in various publications including Nova, The London Times, and The Sunday Times. She is the author of Home in the Sky, an ALA Notable Book, and of several picture books published in England, including One Hungry Spider and Millicent. She won a 2017 Indie Book Award in the Children's category for her book, Circle.

Since 1972, Ms. Baker has worked on "collage constructions," many of which are designed to illustrate picture books but stand individually as works of art. They have been displayed in galleries in Australia and England as well as by Forum Gallery in New York City.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Jeannie Baker was born in England and moved to Australia. She studied art and design in England. Her illustrations have appeared in various publications including Nova, The London Times, and The Sunday Times. She is the author of Home in the Sky, an ALA Notable Book, and of several picture books published in England, including One Hungry Spider and Millicent. She won a 2017 Indie Book Award in the Children's category for her book, Circle.

Since 1972, Ms. Baker has worked on "collage constructions," many of which are designed to illustrate picture books but stand individually as works of art. They have been displayed in galleries in Australia and England as well as by Forum Gallery in New York City.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

K-Gr. 3. This wordless picture book with exquisitely detailed collage illustrations speaks eloquently about urban conservation. Every double-page spread is a view through the same window, a view that changes over a generation, beginning with a couple expecting a baby and continuing as the baby grows up, is courted, and is married in the neighborhood street. At first the sprawl and smog nearly smother the view, but gradually the place changes. The community brings back a variety of local plants, and by the time the young woman's own baby is born, trees block the billboards, there are birds on the roof and in the sky, and cyclists and a bus can be seen on the roadway. Suddenly, there's a glimpse of the river in the distance, a dragonfly on the windowsill, and the full moon shines at night. Unlike some collage art, the technique here never gets in the way. The details show and tell a story about the small things in one neighborhood--their fragility, strength, and connection--and their power to make a difference. With each look at the pictures, there's more to see in the crowded neighborhood that is transformed into a wild and beautiful place. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Unusual collage constructions form vibrant New York City panoramas in this modest tale of Light, a white pigeon who flees his rooftop aviary to explore his urban surroundings. Ages 4-7. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-When baby Tracy is first brought to her new home, the view of the urban neighborhood as seen through her window is not a pleasant one. Billboards and graffiti are everywhere, garbage is strewn across the streets, and only a few meager plants are fighting their way through the cracks in the cement. Bit by bit, as Tracy grows, the area is slowly reclaimed, so that the final view through the window is clean, lush, and green, with birds nesting peacefully in new trees and vistas that reveal glimpses of the now-visible blue river. In each of the double-page views through the window, readers can note not just the physical changes, but also the people in the community actively engaged in affecting those changes and producing a true home. As she did in Window (Greenwillow, 1991), Baker uses natural materials to create detailed, arresting collages that tell a story in which words are superfluous. Children can pore over these pages again and again and make fresh discoveries with each perusal. Whether enjoyed independently or incorporated into units on the environment, communities, or artistic technique, this is a book to treasure.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

K-Gr. 3. This wordless picture book with exquisitely detailed collage illustrations speaks eloquently about urban conservation. Every double-page spread is a view through the same window, a view that changes over a generation, beginning with a couple expecting a baby and continuing as the baby grows up, is courted, and is married in the neighborhood street. At first the sprawl and smog nearly smother the view, but gradually the place changes. The community brings back a variety of local plants, and by the time the young woman's own baby is born, trees block the billboards, there are birds on the roof and in the sky, and cyclists and a bus can be seen on the roadway. Suddenly, there's a glimpse of the river in the distance, a dragonfly on the windowsill, and the full moon shines at night. Unlike some collage art, the technique here never gets in the way. The details show and tell a story about the small things in one neighborhood--their fragility, strength, and connection--and their power to make a difference. With each look at the pictures, there's more to see in the crowded neighborhood that is transformed into a wild and beautiful place. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Jeannie Baker projects a hopeful portrait of urban renewal in Home. As in her previous Window, the picture book unfolds as a wordless series of collages, this time charting the rebirth of a neighborhood as a girl, Tracy, grows up. Readers watch the community come together as a major clean-up effort gets underway, with lush vegetation rejuvenating the dilapidated neighborhood. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-When baby Tracy is first brought to her new home, the view of the urban neighborhood as seen through her window is not a pleasant one. Billboards and graffiti are everywhere, garbage is strewn across the streets, and only a few meager plants are fighting their way through the cracks in the cement. Bit by bit, as Tracy grows, the area is slowly reclaimed, so that the final view through the window is clean, lush, and green, with birds nesting peacefully in new trees and vistas that reveal glimpses of the now-visible blue river. In each of the double-page views through the window, readers can note not just the physical changes, but also the people in the community actively engaged in affecting those changes and producing a true home. As she did in Window (Greenwillow, 1991), Baker uses natural materials to create detailed, arresting collages that tell a story in which words are superfluous. Children can pore over these pages again and again and make fresh discoveries with each perusal. Whether enjoyed independently or incorporated into units on the environment, communities, or artistic technique, this is a book to treasure.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.