Cover image for Haiku : Asian arts & crafts for creative kids
Title:
Haiku : Asian arts & crafts for creative kids
Author:
Donegan, Patricia.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston, Mass. : Tuttle Pub., [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
64 pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm
Summary:
Introduces the form of Japanese poetry known as haiku, explores the seven keys to writing haiku, and provides instructions for five haiku projects, including creating haiga, or illustrated haiku.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780804835015
Format :
Book

Available:*

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LB1576 .D628 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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LB1576 .D628 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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LB1576 .D628 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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LB1576 .D628 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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LB1576 .D628 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

In this multicultural children's book, readers will learn to create haiku--elegant and simple Japanese poems.

Haiku uses images from nature to make a statement or capture a moment. Haiku are short, but powerful expressions--making them easy and fun to write and share with your friends.

The activities in this book will show the seven keys to creating your own haiku and will help you to get started, think up memorable words and images, and write the three short lines that make up a great haiku. With clear expressions and many examples, this is a great way to have fun while you explore the fascinating aspect of Japanese culture.

Kids will learn to write: Their first haiku Haiku about nature Haibun--haiku with a short story Haiga--haiku with a drawing Renga--haiku written to friends.
About the Series:
The Asian Arts & Crafts for Creative Kids series is the first series, aimed at readers ages 7-12, that provides a fun and educational introduction to Asian culture and art. Through hands-on projects, readers will explore each art--engaging in activities to gain a better understanding of each form.


Author Notes

Patricia Donegan served on the faculty of East-West poetics at Naropa University under Allen Ginsberg and Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche was a student of haiku master Seishi Yamaguchi, and a Fulbright scholar to Japan. She is a meditation teacher, previous poetry editor for Kyoto Journal , and a longtime member of the Haiku Society of America. Her haiku works include Love Haiku: Japanese Poems of Yearning, Passion & Remembrance (co-translated with Yoshie Ishibashi), Haiku Mind: 108 Poems to Cultivate Awareness and Open Your Heart, Haiku: Asian Arts for Creative Kids , and Chiyo-ni Woman Haiku Master (co-translated with Yoshie Ishibashi). Her poetry collections include: Hot Haiku, Bone Poems, Without Warning, Heralding the Milk Light , and haiku selections in various anthologies.

She won first prize in the 1998 Mainichi International Haiku Contest and won a Merit Book Award for translation from the Haiku Society of America for her book on Chiyo-ni, also in 1998. Her books on haiku have combined scholarship and insight in reaching young and old to inspire and sustain a lifelong interesting in haiku poetry, in both Japanese and English.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-8. Although this looks like a picture book for young readers, it is actually a comprehensive introduction to haiku that poetry students of many ages can enjoy. Donegan, a poet who lives inapan, begins by explaining basic concepts (what it means to look though haiku eyes ) before she goes on to describe the seven elements of traditional haiku. The remainder of the book offers haiku projects and exercises, accompanied by lengthy explanations, hints, and even word charts to help children create poems. The somewhat stilted color illustrations may put off older readers, and some exercises contain fill-in-the-blank sections, a format that's not ideal for library circulation. But Donegan presents a great deal of information clearly and with authority, and her enthusiasm for her subject is contagious, particularly when she describes what writing haiku encourages us to do: see and appreciate the world around us more. A glossary and a haiku resource guide round out this excellent choice for children as well as teachers seeking fresh materials for poetry units. --Gillian Engberg Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Two books launch the Asian Arts and Crafts for Creative Kids series: Origami by Michael LaFosse, and Haiku by Patricia Donegan. The first title begins with an introduction with suggestions and sources for finding good origami paper, as well as a brief synopsis of terms, techniques and symbols, then demonstrates over one dozen origami projects. Haiku offers a history of the Japanese poetic form and numerous tools to get young poets writing their own. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-These guides offer several simple projects laced together with instructions that are reinforced through repetition. Urging young poets to focus more on characteristic elements, topics, and spirit than on syllable counts, Donegan demonstrates five ways of creating haiku, both as solitary and group efforts. Her many examples range from Matsuo Basho's famous frog to a modern Canadian youngster's "small green growing things/in my old dirty locker/on my ham sandwich." Reproductions of Japanese artwork and children's paintings appear throughout, and generous lists of Web sites, magazines, and organizations are appended. LaFosse's 15 paper models, arranged in order of difficulty from an accordion-folded fan to the traditional crane, include single-piece and modular designs presented through clear, standard-symbol, step-by-step diagrams. Photos of the finished projects are included. Any connection with Asian culture in these titles is limited to occasional references to holiday customs or like snippets. Both contain slightly awkward, strictly decorative illustrations. Still, the books make inviting choices, either for thematic classroom units or for children looking for new ways to express their creativity.-John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.