Cover image for Never, ever shout in a zoo
Title:
Never, ever shout in a zoo
Author:
Wilson, Karma.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Little, Brown, 2004.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 23 x 29 cm
Summary:
Rhyming text depicts the chaos caused by shouting at the zoo.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.3 0.5 79661.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780316985642
Format :
Book

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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Rhyming text depicts the chaos caused by shouting at the zoo.


Author Notes

Karma Wilson was an only child who grew up in Idaho and developed a love of reading at an early age. She was reading a novel a day by the age of eleven. Karma never considered a writing career until she and her husband used a tax refund to buy a computer. Determined to make the machine pay for itself, Karma learned to type and decided to try her hand at writing. After countless rejections, Bear Snores On was released in 2002 and made it on both The New York Times and Publishers Weekly bestseller lists for children's books. Since then, she has had more than 30 other books accepted for publication. Her title Bear Says Thanks made The New York Times Best Seller List for 2012.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Don't even think about ignoring the title admonition, warns the unseen narrator in Wilson's (Bear Snores On) humorous cautionary tale, "because if you do... anything might happen." To underscore the message, the author adds what becomes a refrain: "Don't say I didn't warn you." Sure enough, when a scoop of ice cream falls off a young visitor's cone and she wails in despair, she not only triggers an ever-growing stampede of animals, but also ends up being locked in a cage by a wily gorilla. Wilson works hard to build a sense of mounting comic doom with repetition and alliteration: "And if the moose escapes, he might trot by the apes! All... those... apes. All those clever apes. All those clever, conniving apes that love to play practical jokes!" But author and artist rein themselves in, stopping short of conjuring an entirely manic mood. Cushman's (the Aunt Eater mysteries) marauding animals, while skillfully rendered in watercolor and pencil, are just a bit too tame and small in scale to represent a tongue-in-cheek collapse of the social order. Still, his redheaded, on-the-run heroine has a repertoire of alarmed expressions worthy of a silent movie heroine, and he makes good use of the book's horizontal format-keeping all the action on the same plane to emphasize the ever-growing chase. Ages 3-6. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-In this engaging read-aloud, a little girl stumbles, drops her ice-cream cone, and gives a frustrated cry, despite the narrator's warning to "Never, EVER shout in a zoo-/because if you do-/anything might happen." Before long, the hapless heroine is being pursued by a scary bear, a moose on the loose, escaped apes, and an ever-growing menagerie of other animals. Released from tanks and cages, the creatures exact their revenge and gleefully surround the child, locking her (and some other humans) in a pen. The last page shows the girl, who is now standing next to an exhibit of a frozen dinosaur, stifling another shout. Observers are drawn into events on the first page, where the watercolor-and-pencil illustrations simply but effectively introduce the locale and then quickly propel the action forward. Presented against broad white backgrounds, the expressive animals project a benign ferocity tempered by baffled amusement. The bouncy text makes use of alliteration, repetition, and rhyming phrases as the narrator speaks directly to the bumptious child ("Uh-oh! Don't say I didn't warn you"). This lighthearted romp disguises a slightly scary concept, as captive creatures successfully break their bonds in an otherwise familiar and "safe" setting, but the mischievous tone and predictable developments mitigate the fear factor. Pair this with Shirley Neitzel's Our Class Took a Trip to the Zoo (Greenwillow, 2002) for a silly armchair adventure.-Carol Ann Wilson, Westfield Memorial Library, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.