Cover image for A special day for mommy
Title:
A special day for mommy
Author:
Andreasen, Dan.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Margaret K. McElderry Books, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A little pig does her best to create a special day for her mother.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.3 0.5 77590.
ISBN:
9780689849770
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Adult Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Close your eyes and you will get a big surprise, Mommy!Surprise!Mommy's getting breakfast in bed and a card and flowers and a whole lot more!Why?It's a special day for Mommy!


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 1. For Mother's Day, a piglet sets out to surprise her mom by making her breakfast in bed, picking flowers (the daffodils her mom planted around the house), putting a bow on the bouquet (with toilet paper), and smooshing together a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. The spare text relies on the whimsical oil paintings to tell the real story as Mommy cleans up the mess--spilled cereal, dirt, streams of unwound toilet paper, and globs of jelly--left behind by her enthusiastic young one. The little pig shows her independence and love, and Mom pretends to be surprised by her child's efforts. Although the book was apparently designed as a gift book for the occasion, with a greeting card included, the affectionate bond between mother and child that shines out from the story will make this useful beyond the holiday. Both moms and kids will be tickled by the piggy objects around the house and by the piglet's childlike antics. --Julie Cummins Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

A piglet unilaterally declares a Mommy holiday, and then throws herself into preparations for a "surprise" celebration with comically heedless gusto. Readers get treated to two running jokes: the progress of the very messy plans (the piglet provides her own running narration), and the domestic triage that Mommy silently performs in the wake of her little bundle of energy. "To cut out a heart that's not crooked, fold the paper in half first. No peeking, Mommy!" says the piglet as she makes a card for Mommy; the honoree, meanwhile, mops up a puddle caused by a tipped-over bottle of glue. Mommy's patience never falters-although when her daughter announces (after having uprooted the daffodil garden, strewn the bathroom with toilet paper and covered herself and her clothes with jelly), "I bet you wish every day was Mommy's special day!" Mommy's smile could easily match the Mona Lisa's for the complexity of its meaning. The sturdy, rounded shapes and warm colors of Andreasen's (Sailor Boy Jig) oil paintings exude domestic comfort even as they suggest play. As for his bouncy, self-assured piglet heroine, preschoolers and parents alike will find her very familiar-she's incapable of keeping two feet on the floor at the same time, her eyes shine with seemingly unstoppable determination. Parents don't need to worry about their own children being incited to wreak similarly well-intended havoc: a blank greeting card featuring one of the book's illustrations is tipped into the inside back cover. Ages 2-5. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-A little pig tries to surprise her mother on her special day. She takes Mommy breakfast in bed, unaware that she is spilling milk along the way. Next, she makes a card and leaves behind a puddle of glue, pulls up daffodils from the garden, uses yards of toilet paper to make a bow for the vase, and gets jelly all over herself. As her mother cheerfully cleans up behind her, the piglet plods on, oblivious to the mess she is creating. The resulting "surprise"-a lunch of jelly sandwiches-is mostly the adult's work anyway. The young protagonist comes off more annoying than adorable in this ultimately pale and irritating story. The oil paintings portray a strangely posed and stiff pair of pigs who spend most of the story in front of one flat background after another. Douglas Wood's What Moms Can't Do (S & S, 2001), Charlotte Zolotow's Say It! (Greenwillow, 1980; o.p.), and Rosemary Wells's Hazel's Amazing Mother (Turtleback, 1985) are far more enchanting and inviting stories.-Jane Marino, Bronxville Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.