Cover image for Workplace education for low-wage workers
Title:
Workplace education for low-wage workers
Author:
Ahlstrand, Amanda L.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Kalamazoo, Mich. : W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, 2003.
Physical Description:
ix, 175 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction and previous research methods -- Methods -- Phase 1 : analysis of ASTD data -- Phase 2 : results of the telephone surveys -- Boeing Employees' Credit Union -- CVS Corporation -- Lacks Enterprises, inc. -- LYNX, the Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority -- Two medical centers -- Wyoming Student Loan Corporation -- Case studies -- Summary and policy implications.
ISBN:
9780880992657

9780880992664
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

This study examins a catagory of education and training that is not frequently put under the magnifying glass: employers practices and decision-making processes with regard to workplace education and training for lower-wage workers. It is hoped that the results of the study will both inform public policy and be of use to employers interested in enhancing the education and training that they provide to lower-wage workers.


Summary

This study examins a catagory of education and training that is not frequently put under the magnifying glass: employers practices and decision-making processes with regard to workplace education and training for lower-wage workers. It is hoped that the results of the study will both inform public policy and be of use to employers interested in enhancing the education and training that they provide to lower-wage workers.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

This study examines the current state of workplace educational opportunities for low-wage workers and seeks to determine the underlying causes of why employers do or do not support education and training for those particular workers. They discuss various reasons for denying training to low-wage employees, ranging from bottom-line costs to the high turnover rate among these workers. The authors' findings are based on an analysis of a database of employers' education and training practices as well as phone interviews and site visits to a selected group of organizations demonstrating strong support for training low-wage workers. Although uncovering little new ground, this study does discuss the basic issues surrounding training of low-wage workers and how some organizations are dealing with it, realizing that a well-trained and flexible workforce is the primary asset of any organization. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate, research, and professional labor studies collections. J. A. LeClair SUNY Oswego


Choice Review

This study examines the current state of workplace educational opportunities for low-wage workers and seeks to determine the underlying causes of why employers do or do not support education and training for those particular workers. They discuss various reasons for denying training to low-wage employees, ranging from bottom-line costs to the high turnover rate among these workers. The authors' findings are based on an analysis of a database of employers' education and training practices as well as phone interviews and site visits to a selected group of organizations demonstrating strong support for training low-wage workers. Although uncovering little new ground, this study does discuss the basic issues surrounding training of low-wage workers and how some organizations are dealing with it, realizing that a well-trained and flexible workforce is the primary asset of any organization. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate, research, and professional labor studies collections. J. A. LeClair SUNY Oswego


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. ix
1 Introduction and Previous Researchp. 1
The Need for Workplace Educationp. 2
Lower-wage Workersp. 3
Employers of Lower-wage Workersp. 4
Previous Researchp. 5
2 Methodsp. 9
The Three Phases of the Researchp. 9
Definition of Workers at Riskp. 10
Quantitative Data: The ASTD Databasep. 11
Qualitative Datap. 12
Some Caveatsp. 17
Notesp. 17
3 Phase 1: Analysis of ASTD Datap. 19
Lower-Wage Training Intensive (LWTI) Firmsp. 20
Patterns in Key Training Measuresp. 21
The Impact of Employer-Provided Trainingp. 25
Summary of Findingsp. 28
Notesp. 29
4 Phase 2: Results of the Telephone Surveysp. 31
Classifications Based on Training Motivationp. 31
General Findingsp. 38
Conclusions and Discussionp. 49
Notep. 51
5 Boeing Employees' Credit Unionp. 55
The Workforcep. 56
Education and Training Initiativesp. 57
Lessons Learnedp. 62
Notesp. 64
6 CVS Corporationp. 65
CVS Government Programs Departmentp. 66
The Workforcep. 67
Education and Training Initiativesp. 69
Lessons learnedp. 73
Notesp. 74
7 Lacks Enterprises, Inc.p. 77
The Workforcep. 77
Education and Training Initiativesp. 79
Lessons Learnedp. 82
Notesp. 84
8 LYNX--The Central Florida Regional Transportation Authorityp. 85
The Workforcep. 86
Education and Training Initiativesp. 87
Lessons Learnedp. 90
9 Two Medical Centersp. 93
Mary Greeley Medical Center and UPMC-Passavantp. 93
The Workforcesp. 96
Education and Training Initiativesp. 97
Lessons Learnedp. 106
Notesp. 108
10 Wyoming Student Loan Corporationp. 109
The Workforcep. 110
Education and Training Initiativesp. 112
Lessons Learnedp. 118
Notep. 120
11 Case Studiesp. 121
Lessons Learnedp. 121
Why Provide Training to Lower-Wage Workers?p. 121
What Are the Barriers to Providing Training to Lower-Wage Workers?p. 125
What Strategies and Activities Are Most Effective in Overcoming These Barriers?p. 128
What About Employee Demand?p. 131
Conclusionsp. 132
Notep. 133
12 Summary and Policy Implicationsp. 135
Findingsp. 136
Implications for Employersp. 140
Implications for Employeesp. 142
Implications for Public Policyp. 142
The Need for Additional Researchp. 145
Notesp. 146
Appendix Ap. 147
Appendix Bp. 153
Referencesp. 159
The Authorsp. 161
Indexp. 163
Tables
2.1 Organizations Included in Case-Study Site Visits
3.1 Characteristics of LWTI Organizations Compared with Overall Sample, Percent Composition
3.2 Comparison of Mean Values of Key Training Ratios for LWTI and Other Organizations
3.3 Comparison of Mean Values of Organization and Training Measures for LWTI and Other Organizations
3.4 Comparison of Participants' Initial and Follow-Up Evaluations of Lower-Wage-Oriented Courses and Other Courses
3.5 Comparison of Supervisors' Follow-Up Evaluations of Employees' Performance after Receipt of Training
4.1 Distribution of Organizations by Motivation Group
4.2 Ten Key Training Themes Identified in the Telephone Survey
4.3 Typical Perspectives on 10 Key Themes for Lower-Wage Worker Training
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
1 Introduction and Previous Researchp. 1
The Need for Workplace Educationp. 2
Lower-wage Workersp. 3
Employers of Lower-wage Workersp. 4
Previous Researchp. 5
2 Methodsp. 9
The Three Phases of the Researchp. 9
Definition of Workers at Riskp. 10
Quantitative Data: The ASTD Databasep. 11
Qualitative Datap. 12
Some Caveatsp. 17
Notesp. 17
3 Phase 1: Analysis of ASTD Datap. 19
Lower-Wage Training Intensive (LWTI) Firmsp. 20
Patterns in Key Training Measuresp. 21
The Impact of Employer-Provided Trainingp. 25
Summary of Findingsp. 28
Notesp. 29
4 Phase 2: Results of the Telephone Surveysp. 31
Classifications Based on Training Motivationp. 31
General Findingsp. 38
Conclusions and Discussionp. 49
Notep. 51
5 Boeing Employees' Credit Unionp. 55
The Workforcep. 56
Education and Training Initiativesp. 57
Lessons Learnedp. 62
Notesp. 64
6 CVS Corporationp. 65
CVS Government Programs Departmentp. 66
The Workforcep. 67
Education and Training Initiativesp. 69
Lessons learnedp. 73
Notesp. 74
7 Lacks Enterprises, Inc.p. 77
The Workforcep. 77
Education and Training Initiativesp. 79
Lessons Learnedp. 82
Notesp. 84
8 LYNX--The Central Florida Regional Transportation Authorityp. 85
The Workforcep. 86
Education and Training Initiativesp. 87
Lessons Learnedp. 90
9 Two Medical Centersp. 93
Mary Greeley Medical Center and UPMC-Passavantp. 93
The Workforcesp. 96
Education and Training Initiativesp. 97
Lessons Learnedp. 106
Notesp. 108
10 Wyoming Student Loan Corporationp. 109
The Workforcep. 110
Education and Training Initiativesp. 112
Lessons Learnedp. 118
Notep. 120
11 Case Studiesp. 121
Lessons Learnedp. 121
Why Provide Training to Lower-Wage Workers?p. 121
What Are the Barriers to Providing Training to Lower-Wage Workers?p. 125
What Strategies and Activities Are Most Effective in Overcoming These Barriers?p. 128
What About Employee Demand?p. 131
Conclusionsp. 132
Notep. 133
12 Summary and Policy Implicationsp. 135
Findingsp. 136
Implications for Employersp. 140
Implications for Employeesp. 142
Implications for Public Policyp. 142
The Need for Additional Researchp. 145
Notesp. 146
Appendix Ap. 147
Appendix Bp. 153
Referencesp. 159
The Authorsp. 161
Indexp. 163
Tables
2.1 Organizations Included in Case-Study Site Visits
3.1 Characteristics of LWTI Organizations Compared with Overall Sample, Percent Composition
3.2 Comparison of Mean Values of Key Training Ratios for LWTI and Other Organizations
3.3 Comparison of Mean Values of Organization and Training Measures for LWTI and Other Organizations
3.4 Comparison of Participants' Initial and Follow-Up Evaluations of Lower-Wage-Oriented Courses and Other Courses
3.5 Comparison of Supervisors' Follow-Up Evaluations of Employees' Performance after Receipt of Training
4.1 Distribution of Organizations by Motivation Group
4.2 Ten Key Training Themes Identified in the Telephone Survey
4.3 Typical Perspectives on 10 Key Themes for Lower-Wage Worker Training