Cover image for Nixon under the bodhi tree and other works of Buddhist fiction
Title:
Nixon under the bodhi tree and other works of Buddhist fiction
Author:
Wheeler, Kate, 1955-
Publication Information:
Boston : Wisdom Publications, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
xviii, 260 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Acceleration / Mark Terrill -- Nixon under the bodhi tree / Gerald Reilly -- Martyr / M.J. Huang -- Rebirth / Lama Surya Das -- Where do we go from here / Doris Dörrie -- Zoo Animal Keeper I, rec-svc-zk / Martha Gies -- Hungry ghost / Keith Kachtick -- The golden mix / Ira Sukrungruang -- Buddherotica / Jeff Wilson -- Morning / Leah E. Sammel -- Meditation / Judith R. Peterson -- In the sky there is no footstep / Margo McLoughlin -- Enlarging the Zendo / John Rueppel -- A walk in Kurama / Pico Iyer -- The prediction, and, Teeth / Marilyn Stablein -- Beheadings / Kira Salak -- At the change of seasons / Marie Henry -- Fire sermon / Merry Speece -- Beautiful work / Sharon Cameron -- The mantra and the typist: a story of East and West / Anne Carolyn Klein -- Memorizing the Buddha / Keith Heller - Mi Mi May / Diana Winston -- Greyhound Bodhisattva / Francesca Hampton -- The war against the lawns / Easton Waller -- Tanuki / Jan Hodgman -- No kingdom of the eyes / Dinty W. Moore -- Old horse / Jake Lorfing -- The guest at the Feast of Bon / Victor Pelevin -- Buddha in a box / Cathy Rose.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780861713547
Format :
Book

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PS648.B84 N595 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Pico Iyer, Victor Pelevin, Doris Dorrie and other renowned contributors join young award-winners in what National Book Award-winner Charles Johnson calls "an embarrassment of literary riches," sure to please fiction lovers of every stripe. From the O. Henry Award-winning title story, to visionary short-shorts and barely fictionalized personal memoirs, Nixon Under the Bodhi Tree is inventive, exciting, and unlike any collection before it.


Author Notes

Kate Wheeler is the author of Not Where I Started From and When Mountains Walked . She has received a Guggenheim award, an NEA, a Whiting Award, and two O. Henry Awards. She lives near Boston and teaches meditation retreats around the country and in Mexico.

Charles Johnson is the National Book Award-winning author of Middle Passage as well as Turning the Wheel: Essays on Buddhism and Writing . He is also the subject of the new book, Charles Johnson's Fiction .


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

"Buddhist fiction" is a contradictory notion, admits Wheeler, a Buddhist practitioner and recipient of two O. Henry awards. "Everything that seems to be happening to `you' and `me' is already like a fiction, from a Buddhist's standpoint, and the thing to do is to unravel your involvement in the story, not become entranced and follow it to the end," she explains. Yet she also admits that the Buddhist tradition is rich in stories, especially in the teaching of the sutras. Best to sidestep the spiritual quagmire of this discussion, and just relish the beauty of these well-told tales. Wheeler has assembled a stellar collection, including the titular "Nixon Under the Bodhi Tree," an O. Henry award-winning story by Gerald Reilly. Many stories, with their Zen sparseness, clean imagery and lingering depths, could proudly stand beside the finest of the genre, such as the fiction of Gail Tsukiyama. Marie Henry's half-page story, "At the Change of Seasons," is so spare and profound it reads like a haiku that's been gently stretched into prose. Some speak so intimately to the teachings of Buddhism that they read like inside jokes which isn't necessarily a bad thing, considering how satisfying these jokes are to insiders. For instance, Dinty W. Moore's exquisitely joyful two-page story about reality and illusion ("No Kingdom of the Eyes") could be lost on nonpractitioners, but will easily elicit a chuckle from many struggling students of Buddhism. Another standout is Ira Sukrungruang's classic tale, "The Golden Mix," a commanding, crass and earthy story about what might happen if Buddha showed up at the local dog pound. This collection is all that fans of fiction and Buddhism hope for full of play, insight, revelation and diversity, and never compromising in delight. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved