Cover image for The President's work : a look at the executive branch
Title:
The President's work : a look at the executive branch
Author:
Landau, Elaine.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : Lerner Publications, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
56 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Becoming president -- The leader of the free world -- The president and Congress -- Chief executive -- Director of foreign policy -- Commander in chief.
ISBN:
9780822508113
Format :
Book

Available:*

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JK517 .L36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JK517 .L36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JK517 .L36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JK517 .L36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JK517 .L36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Everyone knows that the president of the United States is the leader of the country and has a very powerful job. But what does the president really do day in and day out? Sit behind a desk and sign laws? Travel to faraway lands to promote peace? You'll need to read this book to find out. Inside, you'll discover what the president's job is like, how the president does this job, and how it affects every American's life -- including yours! Book jacket.


Author Notes

Elaine Landau Elaine Landau has received her Bachelor's in English and Journalism and her Master's in Library and Information Sciences. She has written over 185 books, most of them non-fiction children's books on subjects such as earth science, planets, the supernatural, dinosaurs, ancient civilizations, ecology and contemporary issues.

Landau's books have won the American Association for the Advancement of Science: "Science Books and Film" Best Children's Science Booklist, as well as The New York Public Library Books for the Teenage, the New Jersey Institute of Technology Award and VOYA's Nonfiction Honor List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Reviewed with Sandy Donovan's Running for Office0 . Gr. 4-6. As this election season stretches endlessly ahead, students may have questions about the process. These two slim books in the How Government Works series can provide some answers. In Running for Office0 , Donovan introduces fictional candidate Samantha Brown, a Democrat running for state senator, tracing her journey from her decision to run to her eventual election. Along the way, the author introduces various aspects of campaigning and voting--among them, primary and general elections, fund raising, and voting procedures. Sidebars provide extra tidbits, such as explanations of the two houses of government. Donovan's use of a fictionalized campaign adds interest, but her text is sometimes awkwardly juxtaposed with the many excellent color and black-and-white photos of campaigns and candidates from different decades, sometimes distancing readers from Brown's story. Especially useful is the extensive back matter, which will help kids get involved. In The President's Work0 , Landau covers myriad responsibilities of the presidency, ranging from working with Congress to serving as leader of the free world. Interesting photos and sidebars extend the text. Both books have solid bibliographies. --Ilene Cooper Copyright 2004 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-These books provide a good deal of information about the workings of the judicial and executive branches of the federal government. The system of checks and balances and the connection between the branches are also stressed. Both titles have interesting sidebars, black-and-white and color photos, and helpful diagrams that explain the organization of the government branches. Unfortunately, artwork and political cartoons are unattributed. Occasionally, Kowalski has sacrificed accuracy for simplification. She says, for example, "Civil cases usually involve conflicts among people or companies. But no one has actually broken the law." Civil cases do differ from criminal cases, but a law has been violated, and the case is judged accordingly. Also, the writing in Court is sometimes inconsistent in its level of sophistication. In one place, the author says, "The courts decide real cases." Elsewhere she states, "-a motion to dismiss says the plaintiff could not win even if the plaintiff's claims were the true facts," without clarifying the concept. Kay Cornelius's The Supreme Court (Chelsea, 2000) gives an excellent explanation of the Court and also discusses the types of cases heard by lower courts. Karen Spies's Our Presidency (Millbrook, 1996) is a little less technical and focuses on the office, without discussing the supporting departments within the executive branch.-Lynda Ritterman, Atco Elementary School, Waterford, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introduction: Ladies and Gentlemen, The President of the United States...p. 4
1. Becoming Presidentp. 6
2. The Leader of the Free Worldp. 15
3. The President and Congressp. 22
4. Chief Executivep. 29
5. Director of Foreign Policyp. 37
6. Commander in Chiefp. 42
The Presidential Pathp. 48
The Executive Branchp. 49
Glossaryp. 50
Source Notesp. 51
Bibliographyp. 51
Further Reading and Websitesp. 52
Indexp. 54