Cover image for Order in the court : a look at the judicial branch
Title:
Order in the court : a look at the judicial branch
Author:
Kowalski, Kathiann M., 1955-
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : Lerner Publications Co., [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
56 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Real-life courtroom dramas -- The courts from top to bottom -- All the way to the Supreme Court -- Crime and punishment : criminal law -- Let's be civil : civil law -- Your role in the court system.
ISBN:
9780822546986
Format :
Book

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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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KF8700.Z9 K69 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

The Judicial Branch is made up of all the many different court systems in America. Its job is to take the laws that are passed by Congress and signed by the president and interpret them. When someone has broken a law, or feels that a law doesn't follow the rules set up in the Constitution, a judge or jury must first decide how the law should be explained, if it should be changed, if someone should be punished, and must also protect people's rights.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-These books provide a good deal of information about the workings of the judicial and executive branches of the federal government. The system of checks and balances and the connection between the branches are also stressed. Both titles have interesting sidebars, black-and-white and color photos, and helpful diagrams that explain the organization of the government branches. Unfortunately, artwork and political cartoons are unattributed. Occasionally, Kowalski has sacrificed accuracy for simplification. She says, for example, "Civil cases usually involve conflicts among people or companies. But no one has actually broken the law." Civil cases do differ from criminal cases, but a law has been violated, and the case is judged accordingly. Also, the writing in Court is sometimes inconsistent in its level of sophistication. In one place, the author says, "The courts decide real cases." Elsewhere she states, "-a motion to dismiss says the plaintiff could not win even if the plaintiff's claims were the true facts," without clarifying the concept. Kay Cornelius's The Supreme Court (Chelsea, 2000) gives an excellent explanation of the Court and also discusses the types of cases heard by lower courts. Karen Spies's Our Presidency (Millbrook, 1996) is a little less technical and focuses on the office, without discussing the supporting departments within the executive branch.-Lynda Ritterman, Atco Elementary School, Waterford, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

1. Real-Life Courtroom Dramasp. 4
2. The Courts from Top to Bottomp. 12
3. All the Way to the Supreme Courtp. 22
4. Crime and Punishment: Criminal Lawp. 30
5. Let's Be Civil: Civil Lawp. 38
6. Your Role in the Court Systemp. 44
Glossaryp. 50
Source Notesp. 51
Selected Bibliographyp. 52
Further Reading and Websitesp. 53
Indexp. 54