Cover image for An accidental Greek wedding
Title:
An accidental Greek wedding
Author:
Grace, Carol.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Pocket Books, 2004.
Physical Description:
324 pages ; 17 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780743467636
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
FICTION Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
FICTION Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Library
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

In this romantic romp through the Greek Isles, Carol Grace pens the delightful story of maid of honor and groom-to-be hot on the trail of a runaway bride...and quite possibly falling in love!Jane Atwood has loved Alex Woods for years. His upcoming wedding to her best friend -- the Greek- American beauty Sofia Leonakis -- doesn't make it any easier. Nor does the Greek island setting (is there a more romantic place on earth?) or her status as maid of honor. But when Sofia and Alex have a huge fight five nights before the wedding, Sofia runs off with a mystery man and all bets are off.Thrown together in search of the errant bride, Jane and Alex go island-hopping. Jane tries hard to keep the "honor" in maid of honor, but her attraction to Alex deepens like a Mediterranean tan. Soon, Alex sees that she's not the plain Jane he thought she was -- and that she may be his one true love. Only on the wedding day will Jane discover whether Alex is ready to say "I do" -- and to whom!A Bon Voyage romance!


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

When Sophia Leonakis disappears after a fight with her intended just days before her wedding on the island of Mios, her best friend and maid of honor, Jane Atwood, and the would-be groom, Alex Woods, set off to find her. But as they search for the missing Sophia-and the man she was supposed to have run off with-Jane and Alex fall under the romantic spell of the Greek isles and become something more than friends. Exceptionally vivid descriptions; likable, well-developed characters; simmering sexual tension; and Sophia's large, warm, extended family enhance this funny, emotionally charged romp through one of the most beautiful parts of the world. Light and lively, this is a perfect vacation read. Grace is a seasoned writer of contemporary romances (That's Amore) and lives in Woodside, CA. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter One She was seasick. Her first trip to the Greek Islands, and Jane Atwood's stomach was pitching and rolling along with the blue Aegean Sea. She leaned against the railing of the ferry, wedged among the tourists oohing and ahhing over the view of the island with its white, sugar-cube houses that clung to the lush green hills and the rocky cliffs that plunged into turquoise bays. As the waves slammed against the hull, Jane kept her eyes on the horizon and did not look down. Sofia had warned her the seas could be rough in May. But Sofia wanted her wedding to be in May on the island of Mios, and she wanted Jane to be her bridesmaid, and Sofia Leonakis always got what she wanted, including the smartest, sexiest, most ambitious man in the world -- Alex Woods. Jane thought she'd either have to throw up or leap overboard and take her chances of being washed up on one of the island's sandy beaches. With any luck she'd be rescued by one of those handsome Greek fishermen Sofia told her about. A familiar deep voice said in her ear, "Welcome to Greece. Are you ready to face the madhouse?" Alex had snuck up on her before she was prepared to come face to face with six feet two inches of all-American masculine charm, dammit. To imagine that he'd gained weight and had sagging jowls since she'd last seen him was wishful thinking. No, he was just as gorgeous as ever; lean, tanned, fit, and smiling. And he had the same effect he'd always had on her: he left her breathless, tongue-tied, and awkward. "Oh my God, Alex, what are you doing here?" she blurted. "You were supposed to be on the island days ago getting ready for the wedding." "I know. I got held up in Seattle, then I missed my connection in New York. But I'm getting there as fast as I can. Calm down, Jane. Haven't you heard the saying, 'Siga, siga'? -- 'Slowly, slowly'? This is Greece. They have a different sense of time here." "Sofia has the same sense of time she always had -- she wants everything done yesterday. She must be going crazy that you're not there. But you always did like to make her crazy." "Me? She's the one who makes me crazy. This wedding has turned into a circus. It's not until Saturday, you know. Plenty of time to get ready." "She wanted you here last week for the parties and the baptism and everything else that goes into it. Sofia does everything on a grand scale. You should know that by now. She's been planning her wedding for years. Why do you act surprised?" "I'm not surprised, I'm just on edge." He rubbed his chin. "Bad food, no sleep, jet lag, culture shock. You name it, I've got it." "And pre-wedding jitters?" Jane suggested. Though at the moment she was the one with the jitters. Seeing Alex again, his hair windblown, the shadow of a beard on his jaw, and that cleft in his chin, made goose bumps break out on her arms despite the warm Greek sun. "Real men don't get jitters," he said with a wry smile. Then he turned and looked out across the water toward the island. If they listened hard enough, Jane was sure they could hear Sofia's voice giving orders, venting her frustration, and ranting about her absent bridegroom. "Though this is not the way I would have planned it," he added under his breath. Jane followed Alex's gaze to the red terra-cotta roofs that peeked above the treetops. She wondered which was the villa that belonged to Sofia's family. "How would you do it?" she asked. "Go down to city hall, pay the two dollars or whatever it is, break out a bottle of champagne, and be done with it. I wouldn't have phony posed pictures, snarky hand-written poems to each other, a sky-high wedding cake frosted with wallpaper paste, and an elaborate baptism ceremony for the groom. Why does everything have to be such a big deal?" "It's a once-in-a-lifetime event," Jane said. "Did you tell Sofia your idea of the perfect wedding?" He shot her a look that said, Are you kidding? Jane could just imagine Sofia's response. Either she would have had a tantrum or laughed herself silly. "I understand about the cake and the poems, but the pictures? Wouldn't you want a photo album to show your grandchildren?" "Grandchildren?" He threw up his hands. "Good God, Jane, I'm only twenty-eight, even though today I feel at least fifty-eight. Don't worry, there are going to be pictures and cake and flowers and whatever else she wants. It's Sofia's show and I'm just the guy in the suit. "I know I sound annoyed, but you're the only person I can tell what I really think. You always were, ever since the first day we met. Chemistry 101, remember?" Remember? As if she could forget. He was her lab partner who never blamed her for that unfortunate explosion that singed her eyebrows and blew him across the room. He'd told the professor it wasn't her fault. She agreed. It was his fault, for making her so nervous she'd misread the formula for ammonium dichromate. Was that the day she'd fallen in love with him, when he'd taken the blame for her mistake? "If it weren't for you, I wouldn't be here on my way to marry Sofia," he continued. That was true. Jane had brought Alex back to the dorm to study and introduced him to Sofia, her gorgeous Greek-American roommate. In one fell swoop she'd lost her best friend and the man of her dreams. She'd turned her energies to studying and graduated with honors. No boyfriend, but a Phi Beta Kappa key. "I owe you big-time, Jane." Alex leaned over and kissed her on the cheek. Just a friendly kiss, but it made her heart thud so wildly she was afraid he could hear it. "About the wedding," he said, oblivious, as always, to the effect he had on her. "I'm really fine with it. While she was working on it, I was free to work on other things. So it took six months out of her life and God knows how much of her parents' money -- if she's happy, then I'm happy." He smiled, a perfunctory smile that was gone as fast as it had appeared. Still, Jane felt relieved. However he felt, however late he was getting there, everything would be fine once they arrived. Sofia would understand that maybe real men did get the jitters. She'd understand that Alex was late because he had other things to do, and she wouldn't lose her cool when he showed up. The boat rolled. Jane's stomach lurched. Alex stepped forward and looked at her with concern. "What's wrong? Are you okay? Your face is green. You look awful." She swallowed hard and clamped her lips together. Her knees wobbled and she reached out for something for balance. She grabbed Alex's arm, then she leaned over...and vomited on his shoes. "Oh, God, look what I've done!" Though her stomach felt better, she'd ruined his shoes. "I'm so sorry." "Don't mention it," he said, looking down at his feet as if they belonged to someone else. He probably wished they did. "I think I have another pair." Shocked, she asked, "You mean you're wearing your wedding shoes now?" "I might be. I packed in a hurry. Who's going to notice what I'm wearing on my feet, anyway?" "Sofia will." Jane took a deep breath and felt much more steady, more sure of herself. She was no longer that impoverished, insecure college girl who blew up experiments. She was a CPA with an excellent job, a good future, and a man who wanted to marry her. She was a woman who was up to any emergency. She reached for her large leather purse. "I have a spot remover right here." "Wait a minute." He took the spray can out of her hands and read the label. "That'll take the skin off my feet. Save it for the next catastrophe. Knowing you, I'm sure there'll be one." His teasing grin mitigated his remark. She stuffed the spray can back in her purse, but before she could find a package of Tidy Wipes, he'd cleaned his shoes with his handkerchief. "Sometimes I think you create disasters," he said, "because you're so good at fixing them." "That's not true." She wasn't sure if he was referring to the lab fiasco, or the time she spilled coffee on his computer keyboard and then spent all night reinstalling his software, or the time... "Little Ms. Fixit," he said dryly. "You look better now." He tucked a wisp of her hair that had blown across her cheek behind her ear, then he let his gaze drift down from her pale blond hair to her low-heeled sandals. "A lot better." "Not so green?" she asked, fanning her flushed cheeks and popping a breath mint in her mouth. "That's a relief. I wouldn't want to clash with my hot-pink bridesmaid dress." She knew she looked better now than she had in college, and even better than the last time he'd seen her while visiting Sofia in San Francisco. Her hair was styled differently now -- not that it did any good today, blown around by the sea breeze. And she had an elegant wardrobe of basic beige, white, and black tailored clothes that were right for the cool, foggy city she lived in. Of course, it didn't matter how much better she looked when Sofia was around; all eyes would be on her, she thought with a pang of envy. "Hot pink? That doesn't sound like you." "It isn't me. But this isn't my wedding." "I know how you feel," Alex said. Then he turned around. "Here we are. We'll be docking any minute. Get your bag." Jane glanced toward the island as the tiny port came into view, its shore lined with pink and white tamarisk blooms. Crowds of people were waiting to greet the passengers who disembarked at Mios, but Sofia was not among them. "She's not here," Jane said, pulling her suitcase behind her as they walked toward the street lined with taxis and tour leaders holding signs that said AMERICAN EXPRESS, SILVIA PARTY and ARGO TOURS. "Frankly," Alex said, "I didn't expect her." Jane half expected him to say, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn." But of course he gave a damn; he was getting married in a few days! Alex hailed a taxi for the short ride, and they sat in the backseat with Jane's capacious purse between them. She turned her head from side to side to take in the rocky cliffs and the clear, azure water of the Aegean on their right, and the green fields dotted with wild red poppies on their left. Alex was staring straight ahead of him, oblivious to it all. Of course, he'd been there before. But Jane was enthralled with the views and the smell of the cypress trees that lined the road. "I was hoping Nikos would meet me," he said at last. "I wanted to talk to him before things got too hectic." "Oh?" Jane said. She wanted to say, What about? But it was none of her business. An awkward silence followed. "It's so exciting about your being made vice president," she ventured. Alex turned to stare at her, his mouth open in surprise. "What?" Jane could have kicked herself. Sofia had told her in confidence about Alex's promotion a few weeks ago, so she assumed he'd been told by now. When did they plan to tell him? "I thought you knew," Jane said. "You can't be too surprised, right?" Please say you're not. Please say you're happy about it. "I mean, Sofia's father thinks you're the best. Why shouldn't you be vice president?" "Because it smacks of nepotism -- promoting me, his son-in-law, ahead of other guys who've been there longer. Besides, I have other plans. I can't work for Nikos anymore. I can't design another office building or a warehouse store. That's why I need to talk to him." "Does Sofia know about this?" "I've told her, but she doesn't want to hear it. She won't believe I'm actually going to quit." "I'm sure she'll be supportive of whatever you want to do," Jane said primly. What else could she say? It better be something lucrative, because Sofia has certain standards, certain expectations? If Alex didn't know that by now, it was too late to inform him. "What do you want to do?" "What I've always wanted to do," he said with a faraway look in his eyes. "Start my own business. Use my own designs." Jane knew he'd had student loans to pay off, and that the Leonakises had made him an offer he couldn't refuse when he graduated. "But how will you...?" "Support Sofia in the manner to which she's accustomed?" he asked dryly. "It won't be easy, at first. I've saved some money so we won't starve, but we won't be dining out on king crab every night, either." But Sofia's parents had always made sure she had the best of everything. They'd bought her a condo, a car, and still supplemented the income from her job so she could dine at a five-star restaurant every night if she wanted to. Looking at Alex leaning back in the seat, his eyes half closed, his forehead creased with worry lines, Jane wished she hadn't spilled the beans about the promotion. She squelched a desire to reach over, put her hand on his shoulder, and tell him everything was going to be all right. But he'd just laugh at her concern and ask her why she thought he was worried. Alex was not the type to admit to weakness, jitters, or worries, even to her. She suspected it was the stiff-upper-lip attitude he'd used to cope with his childhood. She decided to change the subject, but the only subjects that came to her mind were connected to the wedding. "Will your family be there for the wedding?" she asked brightly. Alex shook his head. "I think I told you once that my dad walked out on us early on, and he died a few years ago. My mom is remarried. It's too far and too expensive for them to come." "Who's your best man?" "Sofia's brother George," he said. "He's here and it saves one of my friends from making the trip. I know what you're thinking; that I'm not taking this wedding thing seriously. But it's a guy thing." "I understand that. It's just the contrast. Sofia's been planning her wedding on the island since she was old enough to dress her Barbie dolls in white and parade them down the imaginary aisle with her Ken doll waiting at the altar. And you show up with no extra shoes, no family, and no best man. It blows my mind." But maybe contrast was what it was all about -- opposites did attract, after all. Jane knew Sofia's goal in college had been to find a husband. She was smart enough to finesse her classes and graduate, even though she'd often spent her time sketching bridal dresses instead of taking class notes. Jane was relieved when the taxi pulled up in front of the villa. There was no more time for conversation. No more time for her to say the wrong thing, no more time to hear any more of Alex's secrets, or worry about what would happen when the Leonakises learned them, too. They got out of the taxi and Jane stood gaping at the big house with the cream-colored facade and twin towers flanking a huge set of central windows. All of the doors and windows were open to the sea, and the driveway was full of cars and delivery trucks. Alex bounded up the stairs with Jane behind him. A man with an armload of flowers brushed past them, and three women in black dresses and white aprons came rushing down the circular staircase carrying stacks of towels. Sofia and Alex dropped their bags in the vestibule and walked into the high-ceilinged living room. Sofia stood there on a pedestal in her white satin wedding dress, like a queen surrounded by her ladies-in-waiting. "It's ruined," Sofia moaned loudly, staring at her reflection in a full-length mirror that shared the pedestal with her. "My whole wedding is ruined. Why is this happening to me? Why can't anything go right for a change? First the flowers, then the caterer, now the dress. Worse, the wedding is Saturday and my bridesmaid and my groom aren't even here yet!" The women's voices sounded like birds chirping, bright, cheery, and soothing at the same time. "Now, Sofia..." "Everything's going to be fine." "Hold still. Let me fix it." Jane stared at the dress with its high neck, the row of tiny buttons marching down the front of the bodice, and the acres of shimmering satin that cascaded to the floor. It was exquisite, and Sofia looked like a dream with her long, dark curly hair brushing her shoulders and framing her face. What could possibly be wrong with her dress? Suddenly Sofia saw them, and she turned pale. "Alex, stop!" she shouted, holding her hand out like a traffic cop. "You can't come in. You can't see me in my dress. It's bad luck." All heads turned in his direction. Female voices rose and swelled. "Get out, get out! You can't see her. It's bad luck. No, no, no!" The women rushed at him, grabbed his arms, and though they were half his size, pushed him out of the room. The ridiculous sight of a big, broad-shouldered man being shoved out of the room by these determined little ladies brought a smile to Jane's face. As Alex passed her, he winked and muttered just loud enough for her to hear, "See what I mean? I'm irrelevant. I told you it's a circus." "Jane!" Sofia got down from her pedestal and crossed the room, her train billowing behind her, to hug her best friend. "I'm so glad you're here. We have to talk," she added urgently under her breath. Everything was urgent with Sofia. Everything was a drama, and she was indeed the drama queen. "Look at my dress," she said, pointing to an infinitesimal spot on the skirt. "That's nothing. I can fix that." Jane opened her purse and pulled out her tube of Zout, the miracle spot remover. "See? I told you Jane would fix everything," Sofia announced to everyone with a bright smile. Sofia's grandmother closed her eyes and crossed herself. Sofia's aunts gathered around Jane and kissed her on both cheeks. Sofia's mother came down the stairs, followed by a man in a black suit, and pressed Jane to her large bosom. Then she held her at arm's length. "Look at her. She's so thin. And so pale. We have to put some color back in those cheeks to match her dress." She turned back to Sofia. "The caterer called. So far she hasn't been able to find caviar anywhere. And the florist phoned to say there are no lilies on the island for your bouquet. What about roses?" "Roses?" Sofia's voice was full of disbelief, as if her mother had suggested cactus. "Roses are so common." She sighed loudly. "Honestly, if one more thing goes wrong..." Jane held her breath. What would she do if one more thing went wrong? What would she do when she found out Alex was serious about going into business for himself? Sofia waltzed out of the room to change so that Jane could fix her dress. Apollonia, Sofia's mother, guided Jane to a damask-covered love seat in the corner and sat beside her. "I feel so much better now that you're here," she said in a confidential tone. "You have a good effect on Sofia. A calming effect. Without you, she...well, you know how she is. I hear Alex is finally here, too. Nikos wants to talk to him. He has a surprise for him -- a wedding gift." Jane could only hope Alex would pretend to be surprised about the promotion. Though maybe it was best that he was prepared. "He loves Alex," Apollonia said. "We all love him. He's like the son we never had." "But you do have a son." "Yes, of course, but George is not like Alex. Alex has a head for business. Nikos trusts him." And why not? He was loyal, dependable, hardworking, and he'd had the good sense to fall in love with their daughter, Jane thought. "He'd never think of retiring, if it weren't for Alex," Apollonia continued. "Mr. Leonakis is going to retire?" Now what would Alex do? Not only was he going to be the vice president, he was going to inherit the business. When he heard this, he might change his mind. "Not now," Apollonia said, "but someday. And when he does..." Jane nodded. They thought Alex would take his place. But he wasn't going to. Should she warn Apollonia? No, she should not. She should keep her mouth shut. "Have I told you how glad I am that you're here?" Apollonia beamed at Jane as if Jane could make everything right. But she couldn't. She couldn't find caviar for the reception or lilies for the bouquet. She could clean the dress, though, and that's what she would do. "Your being here helps make up for the wedding being in May. You know this is the month the dead souls return to earth to do their mischief. It's bad luck to lend anything or to be married. I told her that, but..." But Sofia always gets what she wants. Apollonia sighed loudly, patted Jane on the hand, and went off to the kitchen to see about the food. Jane sat on the love seat and watched while the aunts and uncles, cousins, and local people came in carrying vases of fragrant freesias, trays laden with nuts and candies, and packages wrapped in gold ribbons and white paper, and then went out talking and laughing. She felt invisible. For all anyone noticed, she could have been part of the furniture. A string quartet set up their instruments in the far corner and began tuning up. She knew Greek wedding festivities went on and on, building and building until the ceremony and continuing on afterward, but the wedding wasn't until Saturday. How much more festive could things get? Sofia came back in low-rider jeans hugging her curvy hips and a tight T-shirt, transformed from a Greek princess to a hip American twenty-something. She laid the dress in its plastic bag on Jane's lap and sat down next to her. "So much has happened," Sofia said in a low voice, leaning toward Jane. "I don't know where to start. First, Daddy is giving us the most wonderful wedding present." "I know. You told me about the job." "That's not a present. That's something that Alex deserves, and that he's worked for." "But does Alex want the job?" Jane asked carefully. Now was her chance to plant the seeds of doubt in Sofia's mind. "Of course he wants it," Sofia said breezily. "Oh, he has some crazy idea about going into business for himself, but when he hears what Daddy has to say, he'll be all for it. If he'd gotten here on time, Daddy would have told him yesterday and everything would be settled. Because he was late, Alex also missed the baptism we had scheduled for him. He missed the engagement party the town people threw for us, too." Her voice quivered. "You have no idea how hard this is for me. I've been waiting all my life for this. I thought my wedding would be all about me, but it isn't. Mother is worried about Yaya making it through the long ceremony. Daddy's worried about the business. No one's worried about me, except for one person." "Alex." "No, not Alex. He hasn't even been here. It's someone else. That's what I need to talk to you about. I've had no one to talk to except..." "Yes?" Jane said, on the edge of her seat. Sofia gave a furtive glance over her shoulder. "I can't talk now, but just imagine how hard it's been when everybody is constantly asking the same questions: Where's your fiancé? What's keeping him? When is he getting here? Are you sure he's coming?" "Now, Sofia, you know how hard Alex works. He probably had things to do." "What things? Leonakis Construction Company has been closed all week because of the wedding." "I don't know." But Jane had a pretty good idea. He was probably setting up his new business, which Sofia had just dismissed as a crazy idea. "Shopping for your wedding present maybe, or packing. But he's here now and everything's going to be fine." She put one hand behind her back and crossed her fingers. "I hope so." Sofia sighed. "Sometimes I think Mother was right that getting married in May is bad luck. Sofia glanced out the doors to the terrace. "Look, there's Daddy and Alex -- they're probably discussing the job right now." Jane noticed that neither of the men was smiling. Nikos was gesturing wildly, and Alex had his hands stuffed in his pockets. "Or the present," Sofia continued. "Daddy's giving us a house." "A house?" Jane's eyes widened. What more could Sofia want? A house, a honeymoon in the Greek Islands, and a husband who adored her. "Where's the house? In Seattle?" That was where Alex had been working for the past three years. "No, silly, here on the island. It's a vacation house. Daddy knows how much I love this island. Now it will always be a part of my life." "That sounds wonderful." Jane shouldn't have been surprised at the size of the gift; the Leonakises were the most generous people in the world. She had been on the receiving end of many gifts herself over the years. "I have something to tell you." Sofia's dark eyes shone with excitement. "You're the only one I can tell, the only one who can keep a secret." Jane tensed. "Maybe you shouldn't. I'm really not good with secrets." "You are, too. You're my best friend. If I can't tell you, who can I tell? Definitely not mother -- she'd have a fit if she knew. And Daddy? Never." "Sofia, come quickly," her mother called from the other room. "Look what just arrived." Two men in overalls were walking up the driveway carrying a huge crate labeled LIVE ANIMALS. Sofia jumped up and went running to the door. "It's the doves," she said. "Finally something is going right. Don't go anywhere, Jane. We have to talk, about...you know." She shot Jane a dazzling smile and went out the front door just as her father came into the living room through the French doors. "Jane," he said. "Welcome to Greece." He leaned down to kiss her on her cheek. His face was lined with wrinkles; his eyes looked sad and tired. Alex must have told him his plans, but he seemed to be taking it well, all things considered. "Thank you, Mr. Leonakis." "This is a happy time, and a sad time, too. Losing your daughter..." His eyes filled with tears. They were an emotional family, wearing their feelings on their sleeves, and Jane didn't know what to say to comfort him. "I see you're working on the dress," he said, making an effort to control himself. He took the seat next to her that had previously been occupied by his wife and then his daughter. "I have a favor to ask you. Sofia says you can fix anything." "Oh, no, not really." Here it comes. I want you to fix Alex for me. Make him take the job. You can do it. "I wish I could, but -- " "It's a small thing, but it's important to me." Nikos reached into his pocket and pulled out a small jeweler's case. "These are my cuff links for the wedding. They belonged to my grandfather, and I want to wear them for this special occasion. The stone came loose in one of them. I was wondering if you could fix it?" Jane almost laughed with relief. "Of course I can fix it," she assured him. "I have a tube of Krazy Glue in my purse here and I'll have it repaired in no time." He smiled and left the jeweler's case in her lap. "Thank you so much. I knew you could do it. And Jane? We're so glad you're here." Jane nodded and tucked the cuff links in her pocket. Then she set to work removing the spot from the dress. It came out easily, and she carried the dress up to the pedestal, where a rack held a long white silk slip and a padded satin hanger for the dress. She held the dress in front of her and looked at herself in the mirror. The huge room was now empty. Voices faded in the background. Instead of the wedding march, there was the sound of a haunting Greek song from somewhere in the distance. Jane twirled around on the pedestal, holding the dress to her shoulders, hearing the satin whoosh as she moved, and wondering -- was she destined to be a bridesmaid forever and never a bride? She was suddenly aware that she wasn't alone. Someone stood in the shadow of the doorway, feet crossed at the ankles, shoulder braced against the woodwork. "Watch out." Alex winked at her. "Somebody might mistake you for the bride and kiss you." He turned and walked out, leaving her alone again, her cheeks burning and her hands shaking. Copyright (c) 2004 by Carol Culver Excerpted from An Accidental Greek Wedding by Carol Grace All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.