Cover image for Anna shares
Title:
Anna shares
Author:
Baker, Barbara, 1947-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dutton Children's Books, 2004.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 17 cm
Summary:
When Justin comes to play with Anna, her mother tries to teach her how to share.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 0.7 0.5 76230.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780525471110
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Perfectly pitched to toddlers, this hand-sized book introduces Anna—exuberant, strong- willed, and lovable. In Anna Shares, Anna finds it too hard to share with her friend Justin. After he goes home, it’s easy for her to share with Teddy, who lets her eat all the cookies.Developmentally right on the mark for toddlers’ concerns and attention spans, these books feature adorable art that reinforces the simple text. Like Anna, toddlers will ask for the Anna books again and again.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Reviewed with Barbara Baker's Anna's Book. PreS. Baker's experience as a preschool teacher shines through in these two little stories, which manage to portray a young child's world in a way that is both beguiling and unflinchingly realistic. In Shares, Mommy puts cookies on a plate for Anna to share with her playmate, but the little girl can clearly see that four cookies are better than two. Anna, whose sweet disposition hides her iron-willed determination not to submit to tyranny, decides not to share. The story's outcome may not seem fair to adults, but toddlers will take satisfaction in the happy ending and preschoolers will find it funny. In Book, Mommy reads Anna her new book once, twice, and a third time. Laundry beckons, Mommy leaves, then Anna reads her new book to Teddy Bear just as many times as he asks. Though Anna initially tugs at her mother's skirt to bring her back to reading, the child doesn't fall apart but finds her own solution. O'Neill's breezy ink drawings, brightened with washes in cheerful hues, contribute to the stories' simple narrative appeal and visual charm. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In the first of two titles by Barbara Baker, illus. by Catharine O'Neill, Anna's Book depicts Anna and her mother spending quality time re-reading her favorite book. The artwork shows her mother heading off to fold laundry, so Anna takes over, reading to her teddy bear. In Anna Shares, the grumpy heroine learns that she can avoid sharing cookies with her friend by throwing a temper tantrum. With just one line of text per page, Baker portrays Anna honestly and realistically, with gentle moments as well as cranky outbursts. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-Preschooler Anna is involved in familiar situations. In the first book, her friend Justin comes over to play. When it's snack time, she doesn't want to share the goodies, despite her mother's supportive urging, and Justin has to go home. Anna is left with the treats, which she divvies up, one to each stuffed friend, because "Sharing is good./Then Anna eats all three cookies./The End." In the second title, the child's mother reads a new book again and again, and then the youngster shares it with her teddy bear. They fall asleep using the volume as a pillow. The books are squat and easy for small hands to hold. The pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations are loose, bright, and appealing. Anna, with her blue hair clip and upturned nose, is simultaneously angelic and self-centered. Though slight, these stories are simple and repetitive and cover topics that will have meaning for the intended audience.-Martha Topol, Traverse Area District Library, Traverse City, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.