Cover image for Organized crime : an inside guide to the world's most successful industry
Title:
Organized crime : an inside guide to the world's most successful industry
Author:
Lunde, Paul, 1943-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First American edition.
Publication Information:
London ; New York : DK, 2004.
Physical Description:
192 pages : illustrations maps ; 29 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780789496485
Format :
Book

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HV6441 .L86 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Looking at the characteristics, resources, and strategies of organized crime from around the world and the social, political, and economic context in which they function, Organized Crime provides a fascinating and in-depth account of the criminal underworld and its inhabitants. From Al Capone and Pablo Escobar to the lesser-known Russian, Chinese, and Southeast-Asian crime figures, this is an insider's guide to each organization's origins, codes of conduct, and control of illegal markets-and the law-enforcement agencies and justice systems around the world that try to stop them.


Author Notes

Paul Lunde lived for many years in Italy and as a young man had close connections with Chicago. He has long been interested in the structure and spread of organized crime, both in the pre-modern and contemporary world, and its relationship with power structures. Lunde now lives in Seville where he devotes his time to a project engaged in mapping pre-modern transnational cultural and economic contacts
Associate author James Morton was, for 25 years, an attorney primarily involved in defense work before becoming Editor of New Law Journal and Criminal Lawyer


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

From the obscure origin of the term ?Mafia? to the hit TV series The Sopranos, Lunde, who, according to his bio, ?has long been interested in the structure and spread of organized crime,? surveys a subculture that most law-abiding readers will hope they never directly encounter. In the first section, ?What Is Organized Crime?,? the author gives a succinct overview, then in part two identifies four major areas of criminal activity: ?Exploiting the Human Condition,? ?Supplying the Illicit,? ?Extortion and Protection? and ?Manipulating Money.? The bulk of the book focuses on crime groups by geographic or cultural origin, starting with the Sicilian Mafia and including those that operate in Britain, Russia, Japan, China, the U.S., Mexico and South America. Color and sepia-toned illustrations, ranging from photos of such recent white-collar felons as Nick Leeson and Michael Milken to mug shots of such legendary mobsters as Al Capone and grimly similar pictures of bloody victims of gangland hits, perfectly complement the incisive text. FYI: James Morton (Gangland International) is credited as the associate author. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.


Library Journal Review

It was Bugsy Siegel who famously explained, "We only kill each other," a half-truth about organized crime that may account for the voyeuristic attraction many Mobwatchers feel for their bloody subject. In Gangster City, however, stand-up comic and Mob-obsessive Downey transforms a period of epidemic gangster turf wars in New York City (1900-35) into a series of sketchily drawn characters and violent streetscapes that make for strangely unvivid reading ("When Piazza arrived and started up the front stairs, the Jewish gangsters opened fire. Unfortunately, Frederick Strauss, an innocent bystander walking past the hall, was struck by a bullet and killed"). While it's clear he's read the books, his command of the literature seems undiscriminating, leaning a little too credulously on the romantic tales of Herbert Asbury (Gangs of New York), for instance. The serious Mob collector may want Downey's book as a comprehensive who-fell-where source, but as a thing to read it is an uncompelling catalog of gangster killings. Lunde's Organized Crime may both delight and frustrate aficionados of Mafia books, since it also unblinkingly treats other criminal organizations (such as the Hell's Angels or various drug cartels) that have comparatively little gravitas or romantic lore. While groups such as the Russian "Mafiya" or the tatooed criminal cult of the Japanese Yakuza are sensational newsy subjects, readers drawn in by such features as the two-page spread on the 1957 barbershop rubout of Albert Anastasia will wish the author had stuck to extending his knowledgeable narrative of the life of the American Mafia. Lunde makes a thoughtful argument crediting the famous 1950-51 Senate Kefauver hearings with disseminating the damaging idea that the syndicate-that most American invention of ethnic collaboration-was entirely an Italian import. This handsomely illustrated work does not displace the peerless Mafia references of Carl Sifakis but is necessary for crime collections.-Nathan Ward, "Library Journal" (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

What is Organized Crime?p. 6
Defining Organized Crimep. 8
Organized Crime Activitiesp. 18
Exploiting the Human Conditionp. 20
Supplying the Illicitp. 28
Extortion and Protectionp. 38
Manipulating Moneyp. 44
Organized Crime Groupsp. 52
The Sicilian Mafiap. 54
Other Italian Groupsp. 74
Organized Crime in Britainp. 78
The Russian Mafiyap. 84
Organized Crime in Albaniap. 92
The Yakuzap. 94
The Triads and the Tongsp. 106
The American Mafiap. 118
Outlaw Motorcycle Gangsp. 172
The Mexican Cartelsp. 176
Yardies and Possesp. 180
The Medellin and Cali Cartelsp. 182
Indexp. 188
Acknowledgmentsp. 192