Cover image for Rain
Title:
Rain
Author:
Bauer, Marion Dane.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First Aladdin Paperbacks edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Aladdin, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.
Summary:
Illustrations and simple text explain what rain is, how it is used by plants, birds, and people, and the importance of clean water.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.2 0.5 77363.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689854392

9780689854385
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
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J READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
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J READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
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J READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Drip, drop, plop, rain falls from the sky. Rain turns dirt into mud and makes puddles on sidewalks. It also helps flowers grow. But where does rain come from? The answer is at your fingertips. Just open this book and read about the wonders of rain.


Author Notes

Marion Dane Bauer was born in Oglesby, Illinois. She attended community college first, in her home town, and then went to the University of Missouri when she was a junior to study journalism. She quickly realized that journalism was not for her and changed her focus to the humanities and a degree in English literature. She switched one last time to focus on teaching english, which she did when she graduated college.

After her children were born, Bauer decided to try her hand at writing. She started out with a children's picture book, but discovered that youg adult novels were more to her taste. After making a career out of writing, Bauer became the first Faculty Chair at Vermont College for the only Master of Fine Arts in Writing program devoted exclusively to writing for children and young adults.

Bauer is the author of more than forty books for young people. She has won many awards, including a Jane Addams Peace Association Award for her novel Rain of Fire and an American Library Association Newbery Honor Award for On My Honor and the Kerlan Award from the University of Minnesota for the body of her work. Her picture book My Mother is Mine was a New York Times bestseller.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Reviewed with Marion Bauer's Clouds. PreS-Gr. 1. Two bright paperbacks in the Ready-to-Read series work well together to present some basic facts about weather for beginning readers. Clouds introduces three kinds of clouds--cirrus, stratus, and cumulus--and explains how they form and what they do for humans ("They give us shade . . .They send our water back to us"). Rain describes how the drops of water in the clouds grow larger and heavier until they fall, bringing relief from heat, and then explains how water goes up to gather in the clouds again. Bauer's text is very simple, just one or two sentences on each double-page spread, and Wallace's line-and-watercolor illustrations show preschoolers outside in the rain and the sun. Both books end with a list of facts for adults and kids to talk about together. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2004 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Two simple science books for beginning readers. The first title introduces the different types of clouds (cirrus, stratus, and cumulus) by stating their defining characteristics. In Rain, a day goes from hot to rainy to clear again, but the scientific concept is not as clearly expressed. Elucidating the cyclical nature of the water cycle without using the word "evaporation" is a daunting challenge. Stating that a puddle "goes into the sky" is not an adequate explanation. Both volumes are illustrated with appealing one- and two-page paintings that show children interacting with their environment and end with a page of additional facts. These books are aimed at less advanced readers than either the "Let's-Read-and-Find-Out-Science" series (HarperCollins) or the "Rookie Read-about Science" series (Children's). Clouds provides brief, but adequate coverage of its topic; Rain is too vague and general to be useful.-Lisa Smith, Lindenhurst Memorial Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.