Cover image for Paris, city of art
Title:
Paris, city of art
Author:
Pérouse de Montclos, Jean-Marie.
Uniform Title:
Art de Paris. English
Publication Information:
New York : Vendome Press, 2003.
Physical Description:
706 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 32 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
pt. 1. Antiquity and the Middle Ages. The layering of people, religions, and dynasties (up to 1140): Saint-Germain-des-Prés ; Early Gothic art (1140-1220): Notre Dame Cathedral ; Rayonnant Gothic art (1220-1330): Palais de la Cité ; The first Valois Kings (1330-1450). -- pt. 2. Modern times. The Renaissance (1450-1540): Hôtel de Ville ; Atticism and Mannerism (1540-1600): The Louvre ; The first Bourbons (1600-1660) ; The first thirty years of the personal reign of Louis XIV (1660-1690) ; The late Louis XIV style and the Rococo (1690-1760): The Pantheon ; Antiquity and the Revolution (1760-1800): The Palais Royal. -- pt. 3. The contemporary era. The last kings (1800-1870) ; The Belle Epoque (1870-1918) ; The turbulent years (1914-1940). -- Epilogue: Late modernity. -- Appendix: Maps.
ISBN:
9780865652262
Format :
Book

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N6850 .P44513 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize Non-Circ
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Summary

Summary

A fascinating, lavishly illustrated history of the art and architecture of Paris combines more than eight hundred illustrations with detailed descriptions to capture the diverse beauty of Notre Dame's Gothic splendor, the French Impressionist paintings housed at the Musee d'Orsay, the Louvre, palace


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

The city of Paris, with its proud history, magnificent architecture, and incredible works of art, is the subject of this enormous volume. P?rouse de Montclos (History of French Architecture) presents a broad, sweeping view of the city through its art from prehistoric times to the end of the 20th century. The book is divided by time into three parts, each beginning with a chronological outline followed by a detailed text, some of it repetitive. Part 1 covers antiquity and the Middle Ages, Part 2 discusses the development of the arts in the aristocracy and middle class from the Renaissance through the French Revolution, and Part 3 begins with the Napoleonic age and moves through the golden era of French painting to the city's becoming the first international art center. The translation is at times uneven, and the author's enthusiasm for architecture is apparent, while his treatment of the other arts is less complete. A good reference feature included here is an alphabetical biographical section with succinct bios of notable Parisians. The bibliography is in French and thus not accessible to the English reader. While visitors to Paris may enjoy the hundreds of color photographs and reproductions in this beautiful, ambitious gift book, they are not enough for most libraries. Not a necessary purchase.-Ellen Bates, New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Perouse de Montclos has created a magnificent publication in every respect. He provides a remarkable chronological anthology of the 2,000 years of art, architectural, and visual cultural history of Paris. The superbly illustrated pages reproduce and recount the making of the City of Light from antiquity to the present day. The text is literate, informative, and well-integrated with the excellent selection of two- and three-dimensional creative design. The 800 full-color photographs, plans, and diagrams are a pleasure in themselves, and their reference value is enhanced by concise explanatory captions. The author, a historian of French architecture, is to be commended for so successfully charting the visual narrative of this extraordinary center of artistic and urban endeavor. ^BSumming Up: Essential. General readers; upper-division undergraduates; faculty and researchers; professionals. R. W. Liscombe University of British Columbia