Cover image for Rethinking ecofeminist politics
Title:
Rethinking ecofeminist politics
Author:
Biehl, Janet, 1953-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : South End Press, [1991]

©1991
Physical Description:
viii, 181 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780896083929

9780896083912
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Biehl examines the contradictions of ecofeminism and argues that social ecology, and alternate framework, offers a more liberating program for men and women, as well as for our beleaguered biosphere.


Summary

Biehl examines the contradictions of ecofeminism and argues that social ecology, and alternate framework, offers a more liberating program for men and women, as well as for our beleaguered biosphere.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Recently, Greens and ecofeminists have had sharp political disputes at conferences and in the media. Here Biehl, a Green, takes aim at several popular ecofeminist books and anthologies, attacking them for sins ranging from irrationality, to poor scholarship, to failure to embrace the " versions of history and science put forth by Biehl's mentor, Murray Bookchin. And indeed, the popular writings she condemns often do demonstrate disregard for scholarship and for generally accepted social and natural fact, urging instead ersatz goddess worship, cosmic unity, the essentialism of the woman/nature connection, and so on. Unfortunately, Biehl ignores the considerable body of ecofeminist theory that has appeared in scholarly journals, theory that itself advances responsible critiques of ecofeminist " And ironically, Biehl's own work is academically shoddy, being alternately undocumented or supported by dated, obscure, or secondary sources. Although Biehl's vitriolic putdowns of ecofeminism may delight some of her Green and social ecology cohorts, the book contributes little to any serious debate about environmental ethics or ecofeminism. L. Vance Vermont College


Choice Review

Recently, Greens and ecofeminists have had sharp political disputes at conferences and in the media. Here Biehl, a Green, takes aim at several popular ecofeminist books and anthologies, attacking them for sins ranging from irrationality, to poor scholarship, to failure to embrace the " versions of history and science put forth by Biehl's mentor, Murray Bookchin. And indeed, the popular writings she condemns often do demonstrate disregard for scholarship and for generally accepted social and natural fact, urging instead ersatz goddess worship, cosmic unity, the essentialism of the woman/nature connection, and so on. Unfortunately, Biehl ignores the considerable body of ecofeminist theory that has appeared in scholarly journals, theory that itself advances responsible critiques of ecofeminist " And ironically, Biehl's own work is academically shoddy, being alternately undocumented or supported by dated, obscure, or secondary sources. Although Biehl's vitriolic putdowns of ecofeminism may delight some of her Green and social ecology cohorts, the book contributes little to any serious debate about environmental ethics or ecofeminism. L. Vance Vermont College