Cover image for German art now
Title:
German art now
Author:
Homburg, Cornelia.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London ; New York : Merrell ; [Saint Louis] : Saint Louis Art Museum, 2003.
Physical Description:
160 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
General Note:
Published on the occasion of an exhibition at Saint Louis Art Museum, Oct. 18, 2003-Jan. 11, 2004.

"In association with St. Louis Art Museum."
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9780891780847

9781858942353

9781858942360
Format :
Book

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N6868 .H649 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

German Art Now focuses on the extraordinary group of artists and photographers that emerged in Germany in the decades following the end of World War II, and whose wide-ranging themes and powerful aesthetic have established them as major figures on the world art stage. Featuring Joseph Beuys, Georg Baselitz, Jorg Immendorff, Anselm Kiefer, Markus Lupertz, A. R. Penck, Sigmar Polke, and Gerhard Richter, this survey examines the way in which, through their sculptures, paintings, and drawings, these artists have confronted issues of national identity, defeat and recovery, mythology and the burdens of history, and the responsibilities of art in society. They have developed new forms of expression in which to address these themes, and their impact on the fields of abstract and figurative art, Pop Art, photo-realism, and performance art has been significant. Similarities of background and generation bind them into a recognizable group, yet, as the authors show, their resistance to any similarities of subject matter, medium, style, or artistic persona continues to ensure their individuality. These innovations, not surprisingly, were also felt in the sphere of photography, and an insightful essay considers a group of German photographers that has achieved worldwide respect. The pioneers Bernd and Hilla Becher taught and influenced a generation whose monumental presentations and technical prowess convey both the ambiguities of subject matter and the ambitions of the medium. Andreas Gursky, Candida Hofer, Thomas Ruff, and Thomas Struth are internationally recognized artists whose works are included in the permanent collections and major exhibitions of contemporary art in Europe and the United States. German Art Now examines pivotal works by these fourteen German artists who first came to recognition in the 1960s and 1970s, and who, with the exception of Joseph Beuys (who died in 1986), continue to create compelling art. This book illustrates the amazing scope and expressive power that this generation has defined. Book jacket.


Summary

"German Art Now examines pivotal works by fourteen German artists who first came to recognition in the 1960s and 1970s, and who, with the exception of Joseph Beuys (who died in 1986), continue to create compelling art. This book illustrates the amazing scope and expressive power that this generation has defined."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved


Author Notes

Cornelia Hpmburg is assistant director for curatorial affairs and curator of modern art at the Saint Louis Art Museum. She is the author of numerous articles and major exhibition catalogs
Sean Rainbird is curator of contemporary art at the Tate in London. His focus on German art of the late twentieth century is well known in both publications and international exhibitions
Catharina Manchanda is currently completing her dissertation on the role of photography in early conceptual art and its significance in recent German art
Robin Clark is associate curator of contemporary art at the Saint Louis Art Museum


Cornelia Hpmburg is assistant director for curatorial affairs and curator of modern art at the Saint Louis Art Museum. She is the author of numerous articles and major exhibition catalogs
Sean Rainbird is curator of contemporary art at the Tate in London. His focus on German art of the late twentieth century is well known in both publications and international exhibitions
Catharina Manchanda is currently completing her dissertation on the role of photography in early conceptual art and its significance in recent German art
Robin Clark is associate curator of contemporary art at the Saint Louis Art Museum


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

This beautiful exhibition catalog examines 14 German artists who rose to prominence in the 1960s and 1970s, among them Joseph Beuys, Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Thomas Struth. Sponsored by the St. Louis Museum of Art, this exhibition features an impressive collection of recent German art, with an emphasis on painting and photography. The interpretative essays belong to a strain of art history that emphasizes the interconnections between art and society. Like The Divided Heritage: Themes and Problems in German Modernism (1991), edited by Irit Rogoff, the exhibition's organizers assert that contemporary German art is marked by the legacy of World War II and the subsequent division of Germany into eastern and western halves. While the curators persuasively argue that German artists have been profoundly influenced by their country's "recent past and political present," their explanations are too pat; instead of opening up interpretative possibilities for readers, the authors want to nail down an interpretation and tell the reader what a particular image "means." This quibble aside, this catalog does a marvelous job of placing contemporary German art in a broader art history context. Suitable for both public and academic libraries.-Katherine C. Adams, Bowdoin Coll. Lib., Brunswick, ME (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This catalog accompanied the show of German art held at the Saint Louis Art Museum (2003 to early 2004), moving to England in extended form later in the year. Homburg, organizer of the exhibition and curator at the Museum, has written the introduction, "German Art: Why Now"; Rainbird, curator of contemporary art, Tate Museum, London, wrote an essay putting the paintings and sculptures into focus: "Past Battles, Distant Echoes"; Homburg, Clark (Saint Louis Art Museum), and Manchada each have written valuable interpretive short essays on each object exhibited; in addition, Manchada contributed an important essay, "The Architecture of Images: Photographic Perspectives," and entries on the photographic works. Artists' biographies and exhibition histories conclude the catalog of the exhibition, based on the holdings of the Saint Louis Art Museum, the most extensive in German art in this country. Major well-known artists reemerge: Baselitz, Beuys, Immendorf, Kiefer, Lupertz, Penck, Polke, and Richter; in addition, photographers Becher, Gursky, Hofer, Ruff, and Struth, who are perhaps not as well known. This reviewer found the photographic section particularly helpful. Good reproductions and good bibliography. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. General readers; lower-division undergraduates through graduate students. E. E. Hirshler emeritus, Denison University


Library Journal Review

This beautiful exhibition catalog examines 14 German artists who rose to prominence in the 1960s and 1970s, among them Joseph Beuys, Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Thomas Struth. Sponsored by the St. Louis Museum of Art, this exhibition features an impressive collection of recent German art, with an emphasis on painting and photography. The interpretative essays belong to a strain of art history that emphasizes the interconnections between art and society. Like The Divided Heritage: Themes and Problems in German Modernism (1991), edited by Irit Rogoff, the exhibition's organizers assert that contemporary German art is marked by the legacy of World War II and the subsequent division of Germany into eastern and western halves. While the curators persuasively argue that German artists have been profoundly influenced by their country's "recent past and political present," their explanations are too pat; instead of opening up interpretative possibilities for readers, the authors want to nail down an interpretation and tell the reader what a particular image "means." This quibble aside, this catalog does a marvelous job of placing contemporary German art in a broader art history context. Suitable for both public and academic libraries.-Katherine C. Adams, Bowdoin Coll. Lib., Brunswick, ME (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This catalog accompanied the show of German art held at the Saint Louis Art Museum (2003 to early 2004), moving to England in extended form later in the year. Homburg, organizer of the exhibition and curator at the Museum, has written the introduction, "German Art: Why Now"; Rainbird, curator of contemporary art, Tate Museum, London, wrote an essay putting the paintings and sculptures into focus: "Past Battles, Distant Echoes"; Homburg, Clark (Saint Louis Art Museum), and Manchada each have written valuable interpretive short essays on each object exhibited; in addition, Manchada contributed an important essay, "The Architecture of Images: Photographic Perspectives," and entries on the photographic works. Artists' biographies and exhibition histories conclude the catalog of the exhibition, based on the holdings of the Saint Louis Art Museum, the most extensive in German art in this country. Major well-known artists reemerge: Baselitz, Beuys, Immendorf, Kiefer, Lupertz, Penck, Polke, and Richter; in addition, photographers Becher, Gursky, Hofer, Ruff, and Struth, who are perhaps not as well known. This reviewer found the photographic section particularly helpful. Good reproductions and good bibliography. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. General readers; lower-division undergraduates through graduate students. E. E. Hirshler emeritus, Denison University


Table of Contents

Brent R. BenjaminCornelia HomburgSean RainbirdCornelia Homburg and Robin Clark and Catharina ManchandaCatharina ManchandaCatharina ManchandaBrent R. BenjaminCornelia HomburgSean RainbirdCornelia Homburg and Robin Clark and Catharina ManchandaCatharina ManchandaCatharina Manchanda
Forewordp. 9
Acknowledgmentsp. 11
German Art: Why Now?p. 13
Past Battles, Distant Echoesp. 19
Paintings and Sculpturep. 31
The Architecture of Images: Photographic Perspectivesp. 105
Photographsp. 117
Documentationp. 137
Artists' Biographies
Exhibition Histories
Bibliography
Credits
Index
Forewordp. 9
Acknowledgmentsp. 11
German Art: Why Now?p. 13
Past Battles, Distant Echoesp. 19
Paintings and Sculpturep. 31
The Architecture of Images: Photographic Perspectivesp. 105
Photographsp. 117
Documentationp. 137
Artists' Biographies
Exhibition Histories
Bibliography
Credits
Index