Cover image for Change without pain : how managers can overcome initiative overload, organizational chaos, and employee burnout
Title:
Change without pain : how managers can overcome initiative overload, organizational chaos, and employee burnout
Author:
Abrahamson, Eric, 1958-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Harvard Business School Press, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
xvi, 218 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Organizational change and its discontents -- Creative recombination -- Redeploying talent rather than downsizing -- Leveraging social networks rather than IT networks -- Reviving values, not inventing them -- Salvaging good processes rather than reengineering them -- Reusing structures rather than reorganizing -- Large-scale recombination -- The fine art of pacing -- Becoming a better recombiner.
ISBN:
9781578518272
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Outlining a positive approach to change called creative recombination, this title identifies five key elements that every company has - people, structures, culture, processes, and networks. It offers a toolkit of techniques for recombining, reusing, and redeploying these resources to achieve cost-efficient, less painful organizational change.


Author Notes

Eric Abrahamson is Professor of Management at Columbia Business School in New York City and an internationally recognized expert on change management.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
1 Organizational Change and Its Discontentsp. 1
2 Creative Recombinationp. 21
3 Redeploying Talent Rather Than Downsizingp. 39
4 Leveraging Social Networks Rather Than IT Networksp. 63
5 Reviving Values, Not Inventing Themp. 89
6 Salvaging Good Processes Rather Than Reengineering Themp. 113
7 Reusing Structures Rather Than Reorganizingp. 131
8 Large-Scale Recombinationp. 151
9 The Fine Art of Pacingp. 167
10 Becoming a Better Recombinerp. 189
Notesp. 207
Indexp. 213
About the Authorp. 219