Cover image for Seven laurels
Title:
Seven laurels
Author:
Parker, Linda Busby, 1947-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Cape Girardeau, MO : Southeast Missouri State University Press, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
336 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
"Winner of the James Jones first novel award"--cover.
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780972430470

9780972430487
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The novel traces the life of African-American Brewster McAtee, a hardworking and innovative carpenter, as he struggles for his dreams to own land and build a home and respectability in rural Alabama. When the Civil Rights Movement explodes, he is drawn into the core of the conflict, where he and his family face the ultimate loss from which they may never recover.The Civil Rights Movement in the South represents one of American history's most important, bloody, and terrifying periods. Seven Laurels takes place during that time, encompassing the years between 1954 and 1994. The novel traces the life of African-American Brewster McAtee, a hardworking and innovative carpenter, as he struggles for his dreams to own land and build a home and respectability in rural Alabama. When the Civil Rights Movement explodes, he is drawn into the core of the conflict, where he and his family face the ultimate loss from which they may never recover.


Author Notes

Linda Busby Parker has been a university professor, a magazine publisher, and a freelance writer. She lives and works in Mobile, Alabama.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Set in a small community between Montgomery and Birmingham, this first novel brings home the historic struggle for civil rights through the personal story of one man and his family from the 1950s onward. Brewster McAtee hears all about the political ferment of the times--the protests, sit-ins, and assassinations--but he just wants to buy his own land, make a success of his woodcraft business, and raise his family: He had plenty to keep himself busy here in his own shed. But when he registers to vote, his business is set on fire. TheKK is always there, even in the next generation, still a menace right next door, and Brewster's racist neighbor, bent with age and cruelty, comes for Brewster's brilliant, gifted son. That gorgeous son is just too saintly to be true, but then we are seeing him through his father's eyes, in adoration and anguish. It's the truth of Brewster's viewpoint, the daily details of work and family, that gives this docu-novel its searing power. Winner of theamesones First Novel Award. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2004 Booklist