Cover image for Home networking technologies and standards
Title:
Home networking technologies and standards
Author:
Zahariadis, Theodore B.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Artech House, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xv, 186 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781580536486
Format :
Book

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TK5105.75 .Z34 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Covering the vast majority of current and emerging home networking technologies, standards and trends, this practical resource offers you a comprehensive understanding of this developing area. The book presents an end-to-end reference architecture, where the main residential services are identified and their network requirements are fully analyzed. You find detailed coverage of both wireless and wireline technologies, including IEEE 802.11, Firewire, USB, HiperLAN and Bluetooth. You learn how the technologies work, how they have evolved, what their capabilities are and what markets they target. The book also discusses fixed-wireless and satellite access network alternatives. applications, operational concept, architecture and protocol stack of higher layer technologies that aim to provide convergence between multiple in-home and access networks. The book introduces the concept of the residential gateway (RG) as a single point of network convergence, and explores important considerations for future digital-smart networked homes.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Chapter 1 The Magic Boxesp. 1
1.1 Introductionp. 1
1.2 Book Scope and Structurep. 2
Referencesp. 4
Chapter 2 End-to-End Reference Architecturep. 5
2.1 Introductionp. 5
2.2 Residential Services Identificationp. 5
2.3 Services Requirementsp. 7
2.4 Home Network Reference Architecturep. 9
Referencesp. 11
Chapter 3 Wireline Home Access Network Alternativesp. 13
3.1 Introductionp. 13
3.2 Analog Public Switched Telephone Networkp. 13
3.3 Integrated Services Digital Networkp. 14
3.4 xDSLp. 16
3.4.1 Transmission Challengesp. 17
3.4.2 ADSLp. 19
3.4.3 xDSL Variationsp. 20
3.4.4 Very High Bit-Rate Digital Subscriber Linep. 22
3.5 Hybrid Fiber Coaxialp. 23
3.5.1 DOCSISp. 25
3.6 FTTxp. 27
3.7 Summaryp. 29
Referencesp. 31
Chapter 4 Wireless Home Access Network Alternativesp. 33
4.1 Introductionp. 33
4.2 MMDSp. 33
4.3 LMDSp. 35
4.4 Satellitep. 36
4.5 Summaryp. 38
Referencesp. 39
Chapter 5 Technologies That Reuse Existing Home Wiringp. 41
5.1 Introductionp. 41
5.2 Powerline Communicationsp. 42
5.2.1 Obstacles Faced by Powerline Technologiesp. 43
5.2.2 X10p. 43
5.2.3 Consumer-Electronic Busp. 44
5.2.4 High-Speed Powerline Carrierp. 46
5.2.5 HomePlugp. 46
5.3 Phone-Line Communicationsp. 47
5.3.1 HomePNAp. 48
5.4 Home Coaxial Cable Communicationsp. 50
5.5 Summaryp. 51
Referencesp. 52
Chapter 6 Wireless In-Home Technologiesp. 55
6.1 Introductionp. 55
6.2 Infrared Data Associationp. 56
6.2.1 IrDA Protocol Stackp. 57
6.2.2 IrDA Communication Rangep. 60
6.3 Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunicationsp. 60
6.3.1 DECT Network Architecturep. 61
6.3.2 DECT Operational Characteristics and Featuresp. 62
6.3.3 DECT in the Wireless Home Networkp. 64
6.4 Bluetoothp. 65
6.4.1 Bluetooth Network Architecturep. 65
6.4.2 Air Interface Formatp. 67
6.4.3 Bluetooth Protocol Stackp. 68
6.4.4 Example Bluetooth Productsp. 69
6.5 IEEE 802.11/IEEE 802.11bp. 70
6.5.1 Network Architecturep. 72
6.5.2 Protocol Stackp. 73
6.5.3 Securityp. 78
6.6 HomeRFp. 79
6.6.1 Network Architecturep. 80
6.6.2 Software Architecturep. 81
6.6.3 HomeRF Securityp. 84
6.7 Hiperlanp. 84
6.7.1 Network Architecturep. 85
6.7.2 Software Architecturep. 85
6.7.3 Hiperlan QoSp. 86
6.8 Summaryp. 87
Referencesp. 88
Chapter 7 Emerging Wireless Technologiesp. 91
7.1 Introductionp. 91
7.2 Evolution of IrDAp. 91
7.3 Evolution of Bluetoothp. 93
7.4 Evolution of IEEE 802.11p. 94
7.5 IEEE 802.11ap. 96
7.5.1 Physical Layerp. 96
7.5.2 Medium Access Control Layerp. 96
7.6 IEEE 802.15.3p. 98
7.6.1 Protocol Stackp. 98
7.6.2 QoS Supportp. 100
7.6.3 WiMedia Alliancep. 100
7.7 Hiperlan2p. 101
7.7.1 Software Architecturep. 102
7.8 5-GHz Unified Protocolp. 104
7.9 Summaryp. 105
Referencesp. 106
Chapter 8 Technologies with New Wiring Requirementsp. 107
8.1 Introductionp. 107
8.2 Switched Ethernetp. 107
8.2.1 Ethernet LAN Topologiesp. 107
8.2.2 Switching Technologiesp. 108
8.2.3 Fast Ethernet Standardsp. 109
8.3 USBp. 111
8.3.1 USB Featuresp. 111
8.3.2 A Comparison of USB and Ethernetp. 113
Referencesp. 114
Chapter 9 Firewirep. 115
9.1 Introductionp. 115
9.2 IEEE 1394p. 115
9.2.1 Cable and Topologyp. 116
9.2.2 Protocol Stackp. 118
9.3 IEEE 1394 Applicationp. 120
9.4 Comparison and Interoperabilityp. 120
9.5 IEEE 1394 Futurep. 123
Referencesp. 124
Chapter 10 Middleware Technologiesp. 125
10.1 Introductionp. 125
10.2 Home Electronic Systemp. 125
10.2.1 HES Interfacesp. 126
10.2.2 HES Application Modelp. 128
10.3 Home Audio-Video Interoperabilityp. 128
10.3.1 HAVi Software Architecturep. 130
10.4 Universal Plug 'n' Playp. 133
10.4.1 UPnP Network Architecturep. 134
10.4.2 UPnP Software Architecturep. 135
10.4.3 UPnP Operationp. 137
10.5 Open Services Gateway Initiativep. 138
10.5.1 OSGI Network Architecturep. 139
10.5.2 OSGI Software Architecturep. 141
10.6 Versatile Home Networkp. 144
10.6.1 VHN Network Architecturep. 144
10.6.2 VHN Software Architecturep. 144
10.7 European Home Systemp. 146
10.7.1 EHS Network Characteristicsp. 146
10.8 Konnexp. 147
Referencesp. 147
Chapter 11 Residential Gatewaysp. 149
11.1 Introductionp. 149
11.2 The RG's Rolep. 150
11.3 RG System Requirementsp. 152
11.4 Potential Hardware Architecturep. 153
11.5 Potential Software Architecturep. 156
11.6 Business Modelp. 160
11.7 Market Forecastp. 161
Referencesp. 163
Chapter 12 The Present and Future of Home Networkingp. 165
Glossaryp. 169
About the Authorp. 177
Indexp. 179