Cover image for Grid computing : a practical guide to technology and applications
Title:
Grid computing : a practical guide to technology and applications
Author:
Abbas, Ahmar.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Hingham, Massachusetts : Charles River Media, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
xxiii, 408 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.)
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781584502760
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Linking geographically dispersed computer systems can lead to staggering gains in computing power, speed and productivity. Ahmar Abbas provides an overview of the latest developments in the field of 'Grid Computing'. A CD-ROM is included with this volume that contains extra resources and useful software.


Author Notes

Ahmar Abbas (South Hadley, MA) is the founder and managing director of Grid Technology Partners


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xix
Acknowledgmentsp. xxiii
1 IT Infrastructure Evolutionp. 1
1.1 Introductionp. 2
1.2 Microprocessor Technologyp. 2
1.3 Optical Networking Technologyp. 3
1.4 Storage Technologyp. 6
1.5 Wireless Technologyp. 7
1.6 Sensor Technologyp. 9
1.7 Global Internet Infrastructurep. 11
1.8 World Wide Web and Web Servicesp. 14
1.9 Open-Source Movementp. 16
1.10 Conclusionp. 16
2 Productivity Paradox and Information Technologyp. 19
2.1 Introductionp. 20
2.2 Productivity Paradoxp. 20
2.3 Return on Technology Investmentp. 20
2.4 Multi-Story Bureaucracyp. 21
2.5 Information Technology Straightjacketp. 22
2.6 Consolidationp. 25
2.7 Outsourcingp. 27
2.8 Toward a Real-Time Enterprise--Operational Excellencep. 28
2.9 Conclusionp. 29
3 Business Value of Grid Computingp. 31
3.1 Introductionp. 32
3.2 Grid Computing Business Value Analysisp. 33
3.3 Risk Analysisp. 37
3.4 Grid Marketplacep. 38
3.5 Conclusionp. 41
4 Grid Computing Technology-An Overviewp. 43
4.1 Introductionp. 44
4.2 Historyp. 44
4.3 High-Performance Computingp. 46
4.4 Cluster Computingp. 47
4.5 Peer-to-Peer Computingp. 48
4.6 Internet Computingp. 49
4.7 Grid Computingp. 51
4.8 Grid Computing Modelp. 53
4.9 Grid Protocolsp. 57
4.10 Globus Toolkitp. 60
4.11 Open Grid Services Architecturep. 61
4.12 Global Grid Forump. 62
4.13 Types of Gridsp. 64
4.14 Grid Networks--Will There Be Such a Thin as "The Gridnet"?p. 67
4.15 Grid Applications Characteristicsp. 69
4.16 Application Integrationp. 70
4.17 Grid Computing and Public Policyp. 72
4.18 Conclusionp. 73
5 Desktop Gridsp. 75
5.1 Introductionp. 76
5.2 Backgroundp. 76
5.3 Desktop Grids Definedp. 79
5.4 The Desktop Grid Value Propositionp. 80
5.5 Desktop Grid Challengesp. 81
5.6 Desktop Grid Technology--Key Elements to Evaluatep. 82
5.7 Desktop Grid Suitability--Key Areas for Explorationp. 86
5.8 The Grid Server--Additional Functionality to Considerp. 91
5.9 Role of Desktop Grids in an Enterprise Computing Infrastructurep. 92
5.10 Practical Uses of Desktop Grids--Real-World Examplesp. 94
5.11 Conclusionp. 97
6 Cluster Gridsp. 99
6.1 Introductionp. 100
6.2 Clustersp. 101
6.3 Industry Examplesp. 107
6.4 Cluster Gridsp. 114
6.5 Conclusionp. 116
7 HPC Gridsp. 119
7.1 Introductionp. 120
7.2 Five Steps to Scientific Insightp. 121
7.3 Applications and Architecturesp. 122
7.4 HPC Application Development Environmentp. 126
7.5 Production HPC Reinventedp. 128
7.6 HPC Gridsp. 131
7.7 Conclusionp. 133
Acknowledgementsp. 133
8 Data Gridsp. 135
8.1 Introductionp. 136
8.2 Data Gridsp. 138
8.3 Alternatives to Data Gridsp. 139
8.4 Avaki Data Gridp. 145
8.5 Data Grid Architecturep. 153
8.6 Conclusionp. 157
Acknowledgementsp. 157
9 The Open Grid Services Architecturep. 159
9.1 Introductionp. 160
9.2 An Analogy for OGSAp. 161
9.3 The Evolution to OGSAp. 163
9.4 OGSA Overviewp. 166
9.5 Building on the OGSA Platformp. 179
9.6 Implementing OGSA-Based Gridsp. 183
9.7 Conclusionp. 186
10 Creating and Managing Grid Servicesp. 189
10.1 Introductionp. 190
10.2 Services and the Gridp. 190
10.3 Converting Existing Softwarep. 196
10.4 Service Discoveryp. 198
10.5 Operational Requirementsp. 199
10.6 Tools and Toolkitsp. 201
10.7 Support in UDDIp. 207
10.8 UDDI and OGSAp. 209
10.9 UDDIe: UDDI Extensions and Implementationp. 210
10.10 Usesp. 218
10.11 Quality of Service Managementp. 221
10.12 Conclusionp. 222
Downloadp. 223
Acknowledgementsp. 223
11 Desktop Supercomputing: Native Programming for Gridsp. 225
11.1 Introductionp. 226
11.2 Historical Background--Parallel Computingp. 226
11.3 Parallel Programming Paradigmsp. 230
11.4 Problems of Current Parallel Programming Paradigmsp. 233
11.5 Desktop Supercomputing: Solving the Parallel Programming Problemp. 234
11.6 Desktop Supercomputing Programming Paradigmp. 234
11.7 Parallel Programming in CxCp. 235
11.8 Parallelizing Existing Applicationsp. 237
11.9 Conclusionp. 237
12 Grid-Enabling Software Applicationsp. 239
12.1 Introductionp. 240
12.2 Grid Computing: Discontinuous Innovation or Massive Yawn?p. 240
12.3 The Needs of Grid Usersp. 241
12.4 Grid Deployment Criteriap. 242
12.5 Methods of Grid Deploymentp. 244
12.6 When to Grid-Enable Softwarep. 245
12.7 Requirements for Grid-Enabling Softwarep. 247
12.8 Grid Programming Tools and Expertisep. 247
12.9 The Process of Grid-Enabling Software Applicationsp. 249
12.10 Grid-Enabling a Mainstream Software Application: An Examplep. 252
12.11 Conclusionp. 264
13 Application Integrationp. 267
13.1 Introductionp. 268
13.2 Application Classificationp. 269
13.3 Grid Requirementsp. 271
13.4 Integrating Applications with Middleware Platformsp. 276
13.5 Conclusionp. 280
14 Grid-Enabling Network Servicesp. 281
14.1 Introductionp. 282
14.2 On Demand Optical Connection Servicesp. 283
14.3 Creating Grid-Enabled Network Servicesp. 284
14.4 Montague River Gridp. 285
14.5 Montague River Domainp. 286
14.6 Sample APIp. 288
14.7 Deployment Example: End-to-End LightPath Managementp. 292
14.8 Conclusionp. 293
15 Managing Grid Environmentsp. 295
15.1 Introductionp. 296
15.2 Managing Gridsp. 296
15.3 Management Reportingp. 301
15.4 Monitoringp. 303
15.5 Service Level Managementp. 304
15.6 Data Catalogs and Replica Managementp. 305
15.7 Portalsp. 306
15.8 Conclusionp. 307
16 Grid Computing Adoption in Research and Industryp. 309
16.1 Introductionp. 310
16.2 A Global Grid Architecturep. 312
16.3 Core Components for Building a Gridp. 312
16.4 Examples of Research and Industry Grid Implementationsp. 315
16.5 Conclusionp. 338
Acknowledgementsp. 339
17 Grids in Life Sciencesp. 341
17.1 Introductionp. 342
17.2 Bioinformaticsp. 343
17.3 Computational Chemistry and Biochemistryp. 346
17.4 Protein Modelingp. 346
17.5 Ab Initio Molecular Modelingp. 347
17.6 Grid Computing in Life Sciencesp. 348
17.7 Artificial Intelligence and Life Sciencesp. 349
17.8 Conclusionp. 349
18 Grids in the Telecommunications Sectorp. 351
18.1 Introductionp. 352
18.2 Telcos as Usersp. 352
18.3 Telcos as Providersp. 361
18.4 Conclusionp. 362
19 Grids in Other Industriesp. 365
19.1 Introductionp. 366
19.2 Grids in Financial Servicesp. 366
19.3 Geo Sciencesp. 368
19.4 Manufacturingp. 368
19.5 Electronic Design Automationp. 370
19.6 Entertainment and Mediap. 370
19.7 Chemical and Material Sciencesp. 371
19.8 Gamingp. 371
19.9 Conclusionp. 372
20 Hive Computing for Transaction Processing Gridsp. 373
20.1 Introductionp. 374
20.2 Hive Computingp. 374
20.4 Conclusionp. 386
About the CD-ROMp. 389
Indexp. 391