Cover image for The bridge is up!
Title:
The bridge is up!
Author:
Bell, Babs, 1944-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
[New York] : HarperCollins Pub., [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
In this cumulative story, a traffic jam is created when everyone has to wait for the bridge to come down.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060537937

9780060537944
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In this cumulative story, a traffic jam is created when everyone has to wait for the bridge to come down.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS. Fun to read aloud, this cumulative picture book tells what happens when a bridge goes up. One after another, vehicles arrive at the water's edge. The bus can't go, the car can't go, the bike can't go, the truck can't go, the motorcycle can't go . . . so everyone has to wait. Young children, who have trouble waiting for most anything, will enjoy seeing the increasing impatience of animal characters who want to get a move on and their satisfaction when the bridge descends and traffic starts up again. Like the animals' moods, the colors in the artwork seem a bit drab until the bridge goes back down; then the sky lightens to sunny colors, and the drivers and passengers all cross the river. With a childlike air that suits the simple text, the illustrations have a great sense of activity and motion, even when traffic is stopped. Great fun for young children. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Because of the titular circumstance, "the bus can't go"-and neither can six other vehicles, each of which shows up in turn with an animal operator at the helm. "So everyone has to wait," writes Bell (the Dainty Dinosaur beginning readers series), in what becomes the cumulative story's refrain. Notwithstanding the clear blue sky and endearingly ingenuous spring landscape, which appears to be rendered in gleeful blended swoops of crayon and chalk, idling is no one's idea of fun. The animals grip their steering wheels (or handlebars) in resignation and stare into space. Bell and Hefferan (Do You Have My Quack?) don't try to distract readers from the stasis of their premise. In fact, the pictures emphasize it by alternating between just two perspectives: a side view of the line of vehicles when a new one pulls up, and a head-on view of the entire group (Hefferan cheats the perspective, in keeping with his naif style). But readers won't be in the least bit bored-thanks to the unusually fresh, cheerful pictures, they'll enjoy watching the line build. When the bridge finally does go down and "nobody has to wait!" the meaning is clear: Sometimes, all there is to do is wait-but it's not too painful, and it doesn't last forever. Ages 2-5. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-In this delightfully simple cumulative tale, a drawbridge is raised and a bus must wait to cross. A car, a bike, a truck, a motorcycle, a bulldozer, and a tractor-all driven by various animals-soon join the line. As each new vehicle arrives, the text lists all of them again, along with the refrain, "-so everyone has to wait." When the bridge is finally lowered, the vehicles rumble across and the phrase changes to "Now nobody has to wait!" Hefferan's pastels are colorful and lively, and the creatures' impatient facial expressions add to the humor. Vehicle-obsessed youngsters will demand repeat readings. Add this to Byron Barton's My Car (Greenwillow, 2001) and Don Carter's Get to Work Trucks! (Roaring Brook, 2002) for a storyhour that will go places.-Rachel G. Payne, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.