Cover image for Island of hope : the story of Ellis Island and the journey to America
Title:
Island of hope : the story of Ellis Island and the journey to America
Author:
Sandler, Martin W.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
144 pages ; 27 cm
Summary:
Relates the story of immigration to America through the voices and stories of those who passed through Ellis Island, from its opening in 1892 to the release of the last detainee in 1954.
Language:
English
Contents:
America! America! -- The examinations begin -- The examinations continue -- Detained -- Entering America -- Building America.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 7.9 5.0 78942.
ISBN:
9780439530828
Format :
Book

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JV6484 .S36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JV6484 .S36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JV6484 .S36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JV6484 .S36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JV6484 .S36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JV6484 .S36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JV6484 .S36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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JV6484 .S36 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

The moving story of immigration to America as told through the passionate voices and stories of those who passed through Ellis Island.

On January 1, 1892, a fifteen-year-old Irish girl named Annie Moore made history when she became the first person to be processed at a new immigrant station at Ellis Island in New York Harbor. In the next 62 years more than 12 million other immigrants would follow. Many of these newcomers would be "pushed" into America--fleeing religious persecution, political oppression, or economic harships in their native lands. Millions of others would be "pulled" into the United States by the promise of new opportunities.

Once they arrived at Ellis, they were put through the traumatic experience


Author Notes

Martin W. Sandler is the author of Lincoln Through the Lens and The Dust Bowl Through the Lens. He has won five Emmy Awards for his writing for television and is the author of more than sixty books, two of which have been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Among Sandler's other books are the six volumes in his award-winning Library of Congress American History Series for Young People, a series which has sold more than 500,000 copies. Other books by Mr. Sandler include: Island of Hope: The Story of Ellis Island, Trapped in Ice, The Story of American Photography, The Vaqueros, America: A Celebration, and This Was America.

Martin Sandler has taught American history and American studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and at Smith College. In 2014 his title, Imprisoned: The Betrayal of Japanese Americans during World War II, made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. Sandler revisits territory covered in his Immigrants: A Library of Congress Book (1995) but expands the scope considerably: first, with a detailed station-to-station description of how immigrants were processed through Ellis Island; then with sweeping discussions of tenement life in the cities, the transformation of the midwestern prairie to farmland, and finally, the role played by immigrant laborers in the growth of railroads and heavy industry. He makes abundant use of original source material throughout, drawing hundreds of brief comments from an array of personal interviews, oral histories, and memoirs, all supplemented by dark but consistently relevant period photos. Though references to Yiddish as the language of the Jews and to a group of Mohammedan priests should not have survived editorial tweaking, this engagingly written, inspirational account will give children, particularly immigrants or descendants of immigrants, some sharp insight into the trials and triumphs of their predecessors. --John Peters Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

This winning history of Ellis Island relies wherever possible on the voices and recollections of the immigrants themselves, giving a personal tone to the writing. Sandler (The Story of Photography) ably captures the lure of America (both real and exaggerated), the hardship and sacrifice required for the journey, as well as the arduousness of navigating the circuitous and sometimes arbitrary bureaucracies of Ellis Island (including the handing back and forth of the currency required to enter, humorous stories behind some of the infamous name changes, and agonizing decisions about who to send back if a family needed to separate). He also describes the often disappointing and challenging experiences of immigrants once they landed in America, from tenements to child labor to westward expansion. As one immigrant recalled, "We thought the streets were paved with gold. Most weren't even paved. We paved them." Black-and-white photographs support the text and compelling sidebars delve more deeply into such topics as beloved New York mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, who worked at Ellis Island, mail-order brides and child labor laws. The narrative also emphasizes the role of children and teens, who often learned the language and customs more quickly than their parents and assumed great responsibility in families. Like Veronica Lawlor's I Was Dreaming to Come to America and Linda Granfield's 97 Orchard Street, this is an inspiring portrait of a seminal generation of Americans. Ages 8-up. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4 Up-The author seamlessly blends factual information with the moving words and stories of those passing through Ellis Island during its years of operation, 1892-1954. A magnificent tribute to those immigrants, the book tells why they came, their experiences in transit, the various inspections they endured upon arrival, what happened to detainees, and, finally, setting out to establish new lives. Expressed here are the hopes, heartaches, and even the humor of the immigrant experience: one Swedish detainee, served bread and a bowl filled "with red stuff," told her sister dinner was "bread and blood." She had never seen tomato soup before. Frequent black-and-white illustrations, primarily photographs common to other works on Ellis Island, have been cropped at corners to resemble photographs in an album. Boxed text provides additional information on such topics as picture brides, various individuals, and the West Coast's immigrant processing center, Angel Island. The only jarring note: it was in 1965, not 1954, that Ellis Island was added to the Statue of Liberty National Monument. This lucid, well-composed work should be in basic immigrant collections to serve both browsers and report writers.-Diane S. Marton, Arlington County Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.