Cover image for The living rain forest : an animal alphabet
Title:
The living rain forest : an animal alphabet
Author:
Kratter, Paul.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Introduces twenty-six rain forest animals from A to Z, providing the name, favorite foods, and unique characteristics of each.
General Note:
Map of Tropical rain forests of the World on endpapers.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.6 0.5 78702.
ISBN:
9781570916038
Format :
Book

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QL112 .K73 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL112 .K73 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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QL112 .K73 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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QL112 .K73 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL112 .K73 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

From the anteater to the zorro...
The rain forest is teeming with life--hundreds of mammals, birds, amphibians, and fish, and millions of species of insects. Readers of all ages can discover this mysterious and beautiful habitat--and why it is worth saving--in this exquisitely illustrated alphabet book.


Author Notes

Paul Kratter is the illustrator of RIVER DISCOVERIES and BUTTERFLY COUNT (Holiday House). He lives in Moraga, California.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2.ratter's Living Rain Forest is an example of what artist Paul Zelinsky has referred to as "the alphabet as an excuse." These books, aimed at children who are probably well versed in their letters, have an A-to-Z format that works mostly as an organizing principle for facts. Here, each letter is matched with a different rain-forest creature, and includes a few animal facts that will appeal to elementary-age children. Vocabulary words, such as arboreal, are defined right on the page. The uncluttered layouts position the text blocks and the exquisite, photorealistic paintings of the animals against lots of white space, and an unlabeled map on the endpapers gives a general idea of where rain forests are located across the globe. With eye-catching visuals, an engaging theme, and basic information, the book will appeal to a wide age range: preschoolers learning their letters with the help of an older reader as well as elementary-age children ready to dive into the science on their own. --Gillian Engberg Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

For Aspiring Scientists A handful of titles will appeal to the scientifically inclined. The Living Rainforest: An Animal Alphabet by Paul Kratter (Butterfly Count; River Discoveries) allows a look at the habitat's creatures from A to Z, including unusual examples of otherwise familiar animals (the Amazon River dolphin and Sumatran rhinoceros) as well as more exotic ones, such as the red-and-green feathered "resplendent quetzal." Featuring creatures from Africa to South America to Australia, Kratter's precise illustrations accompany informative text that brims with animal facts their binomial nomenclature, approximate size and a glossary of terms. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5-Kratter's text serves as mere accompaniment to his acrylic-and-watercolor paintings of 26 animals in tropical rain forests, from the giant anteater to the zorro. Each illustration is identified with the animal's common and scientific names plus an indication of its length. Unfamiliar words in the brief paragraph on the facing page are defined directly below the sentences. Abundant white space surrounds both text and art, enhancing the potential for group viewing. Endpaper maps indicate locations of the animals, but the text rarely mentions where they are found. Although the information provided is not substantial enough to serve as an overview of the topic, the pictures could offer a striking introduction to units about tropical rain forests.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankato (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.