Cover image for Rome the cosmopolis
Title:
Rome the cosmopolis
Author:
Edwards, Catharine.
Publication Information:
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xv, 249 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Cosmopolis: Rome as world city / Catharine Edwards, Greg Woolf -- The triumph of the absurd: Roman street theatre / Mary Beard -- Incorporating the alien: the art of conquest / Catharine Edwards -- Inventing Christian Rome: the role of early Christian art / Jaþs Elsner -- Slavery and the growth of Rome: the transformation of Italy in the second and first centuries BCE / Willem Jongman -- Rivalling Rome: Carthage / Richard Miles -- Migration and the metropolis / Neville Morley -- Germs for Rome / Walter Scheidel -- Embracing Egypt / Caroline Vout -- The city of letters / Greg Woolf.
ISBN:
9780521800051
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Rome stands today for an empire and for a city. The essays gathered in this volume explore some of the many ways in which the two were interwoven. Rome was fed, beautified and enriched by empire just as it was swollen, polluted, infected and occupied by it. Empire was paraded in the streets of Rome, and exhibited in the city's buildings. Empire also made the city ineradicably foreign, polyglot, an alien capital, and a focus for un-Roman activities. The city was where the Roman cosmos was most concentrated, and so was most contested. Deploying a range of methodologies on materials ranging from Egyptian obelisks to human skeletal remains, via Christian art and Latin poetry, the contributors to this volume weave a series of pathways through the world-city, exploring the different kinds of centrality Rome had in the empire. The result is a startlingly original picture of both empire and city.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

"This book is for Keith Hopkins," begins the preface, and indeed, no finer tribute to a great scholar can be imagined than this collection of essays by students of the professor of ancient history at Cambridge University. Mary Beard begins with "Meet Me in St. Louis, Louis," moves on to describe the Roman triumph as street theater, and concludes by showing that Plautus' Amphitruo is a parody of that quintessential imperial celebration. Walter Scheidel's pithy opening, "Rome was a doctor's dream," leads to an analysis of epitaphs showing that there were annual outbreaks of malaria in the summer months. Neville Morley constructs a screenplay out of dozens of epitaphs to illustrate the character and extent of immigration to the capital, and concludes with a graceful tribute to Hopkins's emphasis on "presentation as well as substance." There are seven other essays, all equally original and illuminating. An excellent bibliography and full index conclude a work from which students of Rome at every level can learn a great deal. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels and libraries. R. I. Frank University of California, Irvine


Table of Contents

List of figures
List of contributors
Preface
List of abbreviations
1 Cosmopolis: Rome as World City Catharine Edwards and Greg Woolf
2 The triumph of the absurd: Roman street theatre Mary Beard
3 Incorporating the alien: the art of conquest Catharine Edwards
4 Inventing Christian Rome: the role of early Christian art Jas' Elsner
5 Slavery and the growth of Rome: the transformation of Italy in the second and first centuries BCE Willem Jongman
6 Rivalling Rome: Carthage Richard Miles
7 Migration and the metropolis Neville Morley
8 Germs for Rome Walter Scheidel
9 Embracing Egypt Caroline Vout
10 The City of Letters Greg Woolf
Bibliography
Index