Cover image for Oops-a-Daisy!
Title:
Oops-a-Daisy!
Author:
Freedman, Claire.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Wilton, Conn. : Tiger Tales, 2004.
Physical Description:
26 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 24 x 28 cm
Summary:
As little Daisy Rabbit struggles to learn how to hop, her mother points out other baby animals having trouble with their lessons until Daisy realizes that everyone needs practice when trying something new.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.3 0.5 76475.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781589250376
Format :
Book

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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Daisy Rabbit is learning how to hop, and thereand's a lot of jumping, thumping, and bumping going on in the meadow. "Watch me, Mama!" Daisy cries out as she tries a big hop...hippity-hoppity-flop! Mama helps Daisy up and shows her that everyone needs to practice things. Little Duck is learning to swim and Little Mouse is learning to climb and gather seeds. Daisy keeps practicing her hopping... whoopsity-oopsity! After a long day, Daisy is an expert hopper. But sheand's so tired that Mama Rabbit has to carry her home! See all Editorial Reviews


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Will little Daisy Rabbit ever learn how to hop? According to PW, "In the book's final pages, when Daisy finally hops, the happiness she radiates proves that persistence really does pay off." Ages 3-7. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Daisy, a little bunny, is learning how to hop and she is frustrated by her failure. Mama Rabbit points out several other baby animals around the meadow all practicing new life skills. As Daisy watches, Little Mouse, Little Badger, and Little Duckling all falter in their attempts. She realizes that she's not alone. She keeps practicing until, in the end, she succeeds. Young children will be able to relate to this amiable tale and may be encouraged by the message. The illustrations are charming; Hansen's wispy watercolors are reminiscent of Anita Jeram's artwork in Sam McBratney's Guess How Much I Love You (Candlewick, 1995). While Freedman's story will make a nice addition to larger collections, Robert Kraus's Leo the Late Bloomer (1971) and Little Louie the Baby Bloomer (1998, both HarperCollins) handle the same topic with more playfulness and real humor.-Be Astengo, Alachua County Library, Gainesville, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.