Cover image for I know a shy fellow who swallowed a cello
Title:
I know a shy fellow who swallowed a cello
Author:
Garriel, Barbara S.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Honesdale, PA : Boyds Mills Press, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
An adaptation of the folk rhyme "There was an old woman who swallowed a fly", featuring musical instruments.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781590780435
Format :
Book

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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.3 .G185 2004 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

He's shy, a wallflower. He's the man at the side of the room listening to a duet for cello and viola. Even now you wouldn't notice him. But our shy fellow suddenly has an urge to swallow a cello, which is precisely what he does. And he doesn't stop there. He follows it with a harp, a sax, and a fiddle. On and on he goes, trying to satisfy his voracious appetite for musical instruments. A strange diet, you say? It's the perfect diet for a strange fellow, a strange, shy fellow.


Author Notes

Barbara S. Garriel lives in Bayville, New York. This is her first book.

John O'Brien is also the author and illustrator of Mother Hubbard's Christmas , which Booklist calls "a yuk-filled read-aloud." He lives in Delran, New Jersey.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. As the title indicates, this takeoff is based on the familiar cumulative song, The Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly. In this case, a shy fellow with an appetite for music gulps down a cello, harp, sax, fiddle, cymbal, flute, kazoo, and cascabel. Then he coughs up each instrument, producing an eclectic musical ensemble. The bouncy narrative injects fresh imagery and energetic language into the traditional ditty. The elongated, goofy-looking characters, especially the fish-faced shy fellow, amplify the silliness. The busy, frizzy illustrations, filled with musical foliage, are too detailed for groups, but the story is a surefire read-aloud, and kids will enjoy examining the pictures afterward. --Linda Perkins Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Instead of an old woman who swallows a fly, this droll cumulative tale introduces a shy fellow who swallows a cello. "I don't know why he swallowed the cello," says the narrator, "Perhaps he'll bellow." The tall, mouse-like protagonist swallows "a harp to jam with the cello," a sax to join the harp, and so on, until he eventually burps up not only the cello, but also the other instruments one by one. Like Terry Gilliam's Monty Python animation, O'Brien's (Poof!) pen-and-ink drawings with watercolor wash are delightfully outr? and full of sly humor. The mischievous fellow resembles a scrawny Ichabod Crane, and as he grows larger, his spindly body matches the shape of each musical instrument he ingests (cutaway views show the accumulating orchestra). O'Brien also injects some amusing subplots: the harp that the man swallows belongs to an Irish dancing troupe, and he takes a cymbal from a marching band performing during halftime on the football field. The six spreads that each feature the regurgitation of an instrument make the last bellow of the cello seem almost anticlimactic. First-time author Garriel's text brims with clever rhymes and at times irregular rhythms. "Not so nimble," says the unseen narrator, "to swallow a cymbal.... Strange thing to do, swallow a kazoo." But the good-natured fun will appeal to music lovers and fans of silly stories. Ages 5-8. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-This goofy adaptation of "I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly" begins, "I know a shy fellow-/-who swallowed a cello./I don't know why he swallowed a cello./Perhaps he'll bellow." The instruments the man guzzles come from a wide variety of venues, including a sax from a jazz ensemble, a fiddle from a rockabilly band, and a kazoo from a child's birthday party. When he imbibes "the teeniest, tiniest, petite cascabel," his belly finally rebels and out of his mouth "jingled the bell," "buzzed the kazoo," "tooted the flute," etc., until "-last but not least,/out cha-chaed the cello!" This is a high-spirited and amusing story, and most of the rhythms work well. O'Brien's dynamic cartoons, highlighted with energetic pen-and-ink lines, vibrate with color and action. The main character continually changes shape to reflect the proportions of each instrument he consumes, and his antics are a good match for this silly but enjoyable romp.-Shelley B. Sutherland, Niles Public Library District, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.