Cover image for Handbook to life in ancient Egypt
Title:
Handbook to life in ancient Egypt
Author:
David, A. Rosalie (Ann Rosalie)
Edition:
Revised edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Facts On File, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xiv, 417 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780816050345
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Written by a noted Egyptologist, Handbook to Life in Ancient Egypt, Revised Edition explores 5,000 years of this mysterious civilization. Containing the most up-to-date information and organized thematically, combining historical and archaeological information in a highly accessible format, this volume is the only book that explores all aspects of life in ancient Egypt, from predynastic times to the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms to the Ptolemaic and Roman eras. In this new edition the author discusses the latest findings in areas that are currently at the forefront of Egyptological research. A new chapter on Egyptology describes the history of the field, the results of the latest excavations, and the techniques involved in new scientific studies, such as DNA analysis and the tracing of disease patterns. This newly revised edition takes into account the discoveries of the last few years that have led Egyptologists to change their perspective on some aspects of life in ancient Egypt, including a reevaluation of the purpose and functions of the Egyptian temples, the role of the Great Royal Wife, and the possible date and nature of the Biblical Exodus.


Author Notes

Rosalie David is professor of Egyptology at the University of Manchester, England, where she is also keeper of Egyptology at The Manchester Museum.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

David (professor of Egyptology, University of Manchester, England), surveys Egypt from predynastic times through the arrival of Islam, concentrating on the period before the establishment of the Ptolemies as the ruling dynasty. The chapters are thematic, covering Egyptology and archaeology, history, geography, society and government, religion, funerary customs and beliefs, architecture and building, written evidence, the military, foreign trade and transport, economy and industry, and everyday life. David has added material based on the many discoveries since the 1998 edition. In the chapter Egyptology, Archaeology, and Scientific Mummy Studies in Egypt, which is new, she discusses the application of modern scientific techniques, including medical diagnosis, to mummies. All the techniques are described briefly but clearly. There is a section on the Schistosoiasis Research Project, which may be the most far-reaching chronological study of a disease ever undertaken. Mummies are being tested for evidence of the disease, which is still a danger to modern Egyptians. Among other changes are a brief section on pets added to the chapter on everyday life and a rewritten section on temples to reflect new thinking about the different temple types. The section on TombV5 has been rewritten and moved to the new chapter on archaeology. However, much of the text remains the same as in the earlier edition. The format of the book has not changed. Besides an extensive bibliography, with more up-to-date citations, each chapter has suggested readings, some of which may be available in larger public libraries. The text is liberally illustrated with photographs, line drawings, and excellent maps. Less scholarly than The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt (2000), the new edition of Handbook to Life in Ancient Egypt is recommended for high-school and public libraries; lower-division undergraduates and adults looking for quick information should find it useful as well. -- RBB Copyright 2003 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

YA-From the predynastic times to the Old and New Kingdoms to the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, this concise overview is written in thematic chapters that result in a complete picture of the civilization. Topics include history, geography, society and government, religion, funerary beliefs and customs, architecture and building, hieroglyphs, the army and navy, foreign trade and transport, economy and industry, and everyday life. The book ends with a chronology and a list of museums with Egyptian collections. Not quite as easy to read or as simply organized as a general encyclopedia, the title does provide useful material not found in standard resources for reports and projects.-Linda A. Vretos, West Springfield High School, Springfield, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Praise for the previous edition: Recommended...--Booklist ...belongs on the shelves of the public and school library. The breadth and thoroughness of its coverage will serve the beginning student well, and there is nothing else known to this reviewer quite like it.--American Reference Books Annual Library media centers supporting upper level ancient history curriculum...will want to provide this source for their students.--The Book Report Written by a noted Egyptologist, Handbook to Life in Ancient Egypt, Revised Edition explores 5,000 years of this mysterious and fascinating civilization. Containing the most up-to-date information and organized thematically, it combines historical and archaeological information in a highly accessible format. This volume is the only book that explores all aspects of life in ancient Egypt, from predynastic times to the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms to the Ptolemaic and Roman eras. In this new edition, the author discusses the latest findings in areas that are currently at the forefront of Egyptological research. A new chapter on Egyptology describes the history of the field, the results of the latest excavations, and the techniques involved in new scientific studies, such as DNA analysis and the tracing of disease patterns. This newly revised edition takes into account the discoveries of the last few years that have led Egyptologists to change their perspective on some aspects of life in ancient Egypt, including a reevaluation of the purpose and functions of the Egyptian temples, the role of the Great Royal Wife, and the possible date and nature of the Biblical Exodus. Coverage includes: Egyptology, Archaeology, and Scientific Mummy Studies in Egypt Historical Background Geography of Ancient Egypt Society and Government Religion of the Living Funerary Beliefs and Customs Architecture and Building Written Evidence The Army and Navy Foreign Trade and Transport Economy and Industry Everyday Life. Excerpted from Handbook to Life in Ancient Egypt by A. Rosalie David All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Foreword to the Revised Editionp. ix
Introductionp. xi
List of Mapsp. xiii
List of Illustrationsp. xiii
1 Egyptology, Archaeology, and Scientific Mummy Studies in Egyptp. 1
The Development of Egyptologyp. 2
Early Egyptologyp. 8
Excavation in Egyptp. 14
Excavation Developmentsp. 17
New Scientific Studies Using Mummiesp. 32
Some Notable Archaeologistsp. 48
Readingp. 52
2 Historical Backgroundp. 57
Source Materialp. 58
Table of Eventsp. 62
Predynastic Egyptp. 70
The Archaic Periodp. 75
The Old Kingdomp. 77
The First Intermediate Periodp. 81
The Middle Kingdomp. 84
The Second Intermediate Periodp. 86
The New Kingdomp. 89
The Third Intermediate Periodp. 93
The Late Periodp. 95
The Ptolemaic Periodp. 98
The Roman Periodp. 100
Prominent Kings and Queensp. 103
Other Prominent Peoplep. 108
Readingp. 109
3 Geography of Ancient Egyptp. 111
Land and Climate: Impact on Civilizationp. 112
Source Materialp. 115
Inundation of the Nilep. 115
Agriculturep. 117
Natural Resourcesp. 122
Neighboring Landsp. 124
A Gazetteer of Place-Namesp. 129
Readingp. 132
4 Society and Governmentp. 135
The Keys to Stabilityp. 136
Divine Kingshipp. 137
Social Structurep. 140
Government and Bureaucracyp. 142
Readingp. 147
5 Religion of the Livingp. 149
State Religionp. 150
The Gods and Goddessesp. 151
Temples and Temple Artp. 154
Priestsp. 158
Religious Ritualsp. 160
Religious Artifactsp. 162
Creation Mythsp. 164
Household Gods and Domestic Worshipp. 166
Magicp. 169
Personal Piety, Ethics, and Moralsp. 172
Monotheism and the Cult of the Atenp. 173
Links with Other Religionsp. 175
Religion under the Greeks and Romansp. 179
Christianity in Egyptp. 181
Readingp. 183
6 Funerary Beliefs and Customsp. 185
Importance of the Tombp. 186
Concepts of the Afterlifep. 187
The Sun Cult and the Pyramidsp. 190
Tombs and Tomb Artp. 191
Tomb Goodsp. 194
Osiris and Gods of the Deadp. 203
Mummificationp. 206
Readingp. 207
7 Architecture and Buildingp. 209
Architectural Developmentsp. 210
Architects and Artisansp. 211
The Royal Workforcep. 212
Building Materials and Techniquesp. 214
Tombs and Pyramidsp. 217
Templesp. 220
Townsp. 224
Palacesp. 227
Housesp. 228
Decoration: Religious and Secularp. 230
Readingp. 232
8 Written Evidencep. 235
Contributions to Egyptologyp. 236
Egyptian Language and Writingp. 237
Decipherment of Hieroglyphsp. 241
The Art of Writingp. 243
Writing Materialsp. 244
Librariesp. 247
Scribesp. 248
Educationp. 250
Ancient Egyptian Literature: Religiousp. 253
Ancient Egyptian Literature: Secularp. 256
Classical and Later Authorsp. 258
The Exact Sciencesp. 260
The Royal Titularyp. 262
Readingp. 263
9 The Army and Navyp. 267
The Military: Historical Backgroundp. 268
Early Expeditionsp. 269
The Professional Armyp. 271
Military Personalitiesp. 273
The Police Forcep. 274
Frontiersp. 275
Defensive and Military Architecturep. 277
Battle Strategy and Tacticsp. 278
Weapons and Equipmentp. 281
Campaignsp. 283
The Navyp. 289
Readingp. 296
10 Foreign Trade and Transportp. 299
Foreign Contacts: Historical and Literary Evidencep. 300
Land Transportp. 302
Water Transportp. 306
Mapsp. 308
Trade of Goodsp. 308
Trading Expeditionsp. 311
Trade in the Greco-Roman Periodp. 313
Readingp. 315
11 Economy and Industryp. 317
The Economic Systemp. 318
Industryp. 322
Readingp. 355
12 Everyday Lifep. 357
Habitation and Populationp. 358
The Familyp. 359
The Homep. 361
Food and Drinkp. 364
Personal Appearancep. 366
Entertainmentp. 369
Medicinep. 373
Readingp. 377
Chronological Tablep. 379
List of Museums with Egyptian Collectionsp. 381
Bibliographyp. 385
Indexp. 397