Cover image for The paid companion
Title:
The paid companion
Author:
Quick, Amanda.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : G.P. Putnam's Sons, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
418 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780399151743
Format :
Book

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary

In order to pursue his quest to catch a killer while keeping the high-society husband-hunters at bay, the Earl of St. Merryn hires the sensible Elenora Lodge to pose as his fianc ee during the upcoming London season.


Author Notes

Jayne Ann Krentz was born in Borrego Springs, California on March 28, 1948. She received a B.A. in history from the University of California at Santa Cruz and a master's degree in library science from San Jose State University. Before becoming a full-time author, she worked as a librarian.

She has written under seven different names: Jayne Bentley, Amanda Glass, Stephanie James, Jayne Taylor, Jayne Castle, Amanda Quick and Jayne Ann Krentz. Her first book, Gentle Pirate, was published in 1980 under the name Jayne Castle. She currently uses only three personas to represent her three specialties. She uses the name Jayne Ann Krentz for her contemporary pieces, Amanda Quick for her historical fiction pieces, and Jayne Castle for her futuristic pieces. She has written numerous books under the pseudonym Amanda Quick including Surrender, Scandal, Seduction, Affair, With This Ring, I Thee Wed, Garden of Lies, Burning Lamp, and Quicksilver.

She has received numerous awards for her work including the 1995 Romantic Times Reviewer's Choice Award for Trust Me, the 2004 Romantic Times Reviewer's Choice Award for Falling Awake, the Romantic Times Career Achievement Award, the Romantic Times Jane Austen Award, and the Susan Koppelman Award for Feminist Studies for Dangerous Men and Adventurous Women: Romance Writers on the Appeal of the Romance. She made the New York Times Best Seller List in 2017 with her title, The Girl Who Knew Too Much.

(Bowker Author Biography) Amanda Quick, who also writes under her real name, Jayne Ann Krentz, is the author of contemporary & historical romances. She resides in the Pacific Northwest with her husband, Frank.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Elenora Lodge is in quite a fix. Her stepfather lost her farm and all of her possessions in a mining venture, and her fiance dumps her faster than the proverbial hot potato. But Elenora is practical and pragmatic. So when Arthur Lancaster, earl of St. Merryn, offers her a position as a paid companion, she accepts. St. Merryn is in a bit of a fix himself. His favorite uncle has been murdered, and he's sworn vengeance on the killer, a mad alchemist intent on perfecting the ultimate weapon of mass destruction. Unfortunately, St. Merryn's fiancee has also dumped him, and his renewed status as one of London's most eligible bachelors is interfering with his quest for justice, hence his paying Elenora to pose as his new fiancee. Once again, the incomparable Quick (Jayne Ann Krentz) has whipped up a delectable Regency romance that mixes humor, suspense, and tantalizing historical detail with all the savory ingredients her fans have come to expect: a feisty, resourceful heroine; a hero with a decidedly dangerous edge; witty repartee; and strongly appealing secondary characters. Another winner from a major romance star. --Shelley Mosley Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

With 41 bestsellers to her credit, Jayne Ann Krentz (aka Quick) still approaches a new project as if novel writing were a just-discovered pleasure she can't wait to share. This late Regency romance offers her signature goodies. Elenora Lodge loses the manor to which she was born and thus becomes the eponymous paid companion. She is, of course, plucky, intellectual, democratic, lovely and unabashedly eager to surrender her virginity to the right man: "Sensation whipped through her; a glorious, heady, dizzying whirlpool of passion. She knew that if she did not explore these thrilling emotions with him she would carry the regret with her for the rest of her life." The source of the whirlpool is Arthur Lancaster, earl of St. Merryn, cranky, quirky, decent to the death, with a sizable fortune and lusty nature to match. Although a happy ending is never in doubt, a murder mystery is threaded through the love story, allowing the besotted couple to sleuth in dark alleyways between tumbles in bed. Quick draws on Regency fascination with science to inform villainous madman Parker, who styles himself "England's second Newton" and terrorizes Elenora with a precursor of the laser. Masked balls, upper-class gambling, women who manage their own affairs and marry for love: if this is familiar territory, it still satisfies. And when Arthur proposes, readers will be right there with Elenora: "The most delicious sense of joy unfurled within her." Agent, Stephen Ayelrod. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Starred Review. Paid Companion is best summed up by the word charming and is made all the more so by Michael Page's dry-witted reading. Elenora Lodge is left with nothing after her stepfather's death, so she decides to become a paid companion until she earns enough money to open a bookstore. The Earl of St. Merryn needs a wife as a cover while he scours London in search of his great-uncle's murderer. Since a real fiancée would expect nuptials, he hires a paid companion to play the role. Elenora is not in her first flush of youth, and Page's rendition doesn't attempt to put her there. No-nonsense and low-pitched, she is nevertheless definitely feminine. St. Merryn, by contrast, is decidedly masculine, with all the attendant crisp edges. Page's use of lilt and inflection makes it easy to identify the speaker and follow the mystery. Quick's best outing in ages; recommended for all libraries.--Jodi L. Israel, MLS, Jamaica Plain, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.