Cover image for More stories we tell : the best contemporary short stories by North American women
Title:
More stories we tell : the best contemporary short stories by North American women
Author:
Martin, Wendy, 1940-
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Pantheon Books, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
xv, 362 pages ; 21 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780375714504
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PS647.W6 M67 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The second collectionnbsp;drawn together by editor Wendy Martin, these twenty-four exquisitenbsp;examples of contemporary writing feature stories by Joyce Carol Oates, Margaret Atwood, Mary Gaitskill, Alice Munro, Sandra Cisneros, and Lorrie Moore (to name a few).

We Are the Stories We Tell is also available from Pantheon.


Author Notes

WENDY MARTIN is chair of the Department of English at Claremont Graduate University. She is also the editor of We Are the Stories We Tell (available from Pantheon). She lives in Berkeley, California.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

This follow-up to the well-received anthology We Are the Stories We Tell (1990) explores the lives of women in the latter half of the twentieth century. The two dozen stories gathered here are written by an interesting and powerful group of contemporary female writers. It is up to the reader to decide whether or not, collectively, these voices speak to all women in modern times, but there is no doubt that the characters in these stories make up a broad group both ethnically and socially. Writers are well known and well regarded and include Jamaica Kincaid, Margaret Atwood, Grace Paley, and Louise Erdrich. The flow from one story to another is gentle, clearly a result of thoughtful editing. Fans of the short story will find some favorites, like Ellen Gilchrist's Light Can Be Both Wave and Particle and Toni Cade Bambara's The Lesson, as well as some interesting and unexpected choices, such as Gish Jen's Who's Irish? This is an excellent anthology, one to read and reread many times. --Debi Lewis Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Following editor Martin's 1990 anthology, We Are the Stories We Tell, this volume matches-and perhaps even surpasses-its predecessor. Martin's goal, she writes in her introduction, is "to provide representative narratives that are a pleasure to read and portray women's experiences in the final decades of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first," and her anthology delivers on both fronts. Its roster is a virtual who's who of contemporary letters, featuring writers who rose to prominence in the 1970s and '80s (Ann Beattie, Bobbie Ann Mason), the '90s (Mary Gaitskill, Lorrie Moore) and the current decade (Jhumpa Lahiri, ZZ Packer). Joyce Carol Oates's "Love, Forever" shocks and chills in just four pages, as a mother murders to keep her lover. Alice Munro proves again her incomparable ability to capture entire lifetimes while retaining the intimacy of singular moments in "Floating Bridge." Amy Hempel's "Beg, Sl Tog, Inc, Cont, Rep" is a gorgeous story of loss, healing and obsessive knitting. Writers who are sometimes overlooked, such as Kate Braverman, Toni Cade Bambara and Stephanie Vaughn, earn spots here as well. The narrator in Jamaica Kincaid's "Song of Roland" mourns that "joy is so short-lived there isn't enough time to dwell on its occurrence." But readers of this volume will find lasting pleasure in the strength, breadth and emotional resonance of the stories here; this book is a boon for any fan of contemporary writing by women. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved