Cover image for The art of Romare Bearden
Title:
The art of Romare Bearden
Author:
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington : National Gallery of Art, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xi, 334 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 28 cm
General Note:
"Exhibition dates: National Gallery of Art, Sept. 14, 2003-Jan. 4, 2004 and several other venues in the U.S."
Language:
English
Contents:
Foreword / Earl A. Powell III -- Acknowledgments / Ruth Fine -- Lenders to the exhibition -- To Romare Bearden / Derek Walcott -- Romare Bearden : the spaces between / Ruth Fine -- Bearden's musée imaginaire / Sarah Kennel -- Bearden's dialogue with Africa and the avant-garde / Nnamdi Elleh -- Reading Bearden / Jacqueline Francis -- A refracted image : selected exhibitions and reviews of Bearden's work / Abdul Goler -- Romare Bearden : a chronology / Rocío Aranda-Alvarado and Sarah Kennel with Carmenita Higginbotham -- Chronological list of works in the exhibition.
Added Corporate Author:
Electronic Access:
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip044/2003011001.html
ISBN:
9780894683022

9780810946408
Format :
Book

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N6537.B4 A4 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Bearden was a diverse artist who worked in many mediums. This book, which accompanies a major retrospective at the National Gallery of Art, is the last word on this important figure. 300 illustrations.


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Published in conjunction with the National Gallery's recent retrospective, this oversized volume offers a look at Romare Bearden's (1911-1988) creative history, critical essays on his work and origins, and plates of his paintings, sketches and vibrant signature collages. Fine, a curator at the National Gallery, sketches Bearden's biography swiftly but with detail, describing the North Carolina native's family life during the Harlem Renaissance in New York (their circle included Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington and Paul Robeson), his influential early friendships and the political cartoons with which he began his artistic career. A handful of thoughtful essays by art history scholars and curators piece together Bearden's influences, reading habits and the range of responses his work evoked. They emphasize Bearden's sense of rootedness in Western art and the "selective appropriation of canonical images" that became essential in his expression of African-Americans' complex identity and experience. Bearden's works are juxtaposed here with those of other ages and places-from Renaissance painter Duccio di Buoninsegna to Impressionist Degas, and from African sculpture to works by Picasso and Matisse. The "bibliophile" Bearden was an avid reader and writer whose lifelong scholarship informed his reflections on art. The written record he left behind, both in published essays and unpublished letters, "affords a rare opportunity to consider art as a result of thinking and reasoning" instead of romantically springing forth from the "sensitive soul's churning depths." This is a discerning retrospective that will appeal most to those interested in understanding Bearden's artistic inspiration and intellectual breadth. 224 color photos, 86 b&w illustrations. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.


Library Journal Review

During the next two years, a major retrospective exhibition of Romare Bearden's work will travel from the National Gallery in Washington, DC, to San Francisco, Dallas, New York, and Atlanta. Such an occasion calls for a catalog as compelling and far-reaching as this elegant volume, which provides an intellectually stimulating and visually exciting record of the worlds of Bearden (1911-88). As part of the Harlem Renaissance, Bearden found his influences in a variety of geographies, cultures, and religions: Harlem and the Caribbean, European and African art, blues and hymns. Fine (exhibition curator, National Gallery) provides a splendid general view of the life and development of the artist's work; essays by a number of outstanding scholars cover more specific areas. Many of the works included have rarely been seen by the public, giving readers a marvelous opportunity to view a wide range of paintings, book illustrations, and costume designs along with the better-known collages, all in finely executed illustrations (224 color, 86 b&w). This important contribution to the history of 20th-century American art is highly recommended.-Paula Frosch, Metropolitan Museum of Art Lib., New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Published in conjunction with the National Gallery's recent retrospective, this oversized volume offers a look at Romare Bearden's (1911-1988) creative history, critical essays on his work and origins, and plates of his paintings, sketches and vibrant signature collages. Fine, a curator at the National Gallery, sketches Bearden's biography swiftly but with detail, describing the North Carolina native's family life during the Harlem Renaissance in New York (their circle included Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington and Paul Robeson), his influential early friendships and the political cartoons with which he began his artistic career. A handful of thoughtful essays by art history scholars and curators piece together Bearden's influences, reading habits and the range of responses his work evoked. They emphasize Bearden's sense of rootedness in Western art and the "selective appropriation of canonical images" that became essential in his expression of African-Americans' complex identity and experience. Bearden's works are juxtaposed here with those of other ages and places-from Renaissance painter Duccio di Buoninsegna to Impressionist Degas, and from African sculpture to works by Picasso and Matisse. The "bibliophile" Bearden was an avid reader and writer whose lifelong scholarship informed his reflections on art. The written record he left behind, both in published essays and unpublished letters, "affords a rare opportunity to consider art as a result of thinking and reasoning" instead of romantically springing forth from the "sensitive soul's churning depths." This is a discerning retrospective that will appeal most to those interested in understanding Bearden's artistic inspiration and intellectual breadth. 224 color photos, 86 b&w illustrations. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.


Library Journal Review

During the next two years, a major retrospective exhibition of Romare Bearden's work will travel from the National Gallery in Washington, DC, to San Francisco, Dallas, New York, and Atlanta. Such an occasion calls for a catalog as compelling and far-reaching as this elegant volume, which provides an intellectually stimulating and visually exciting record of the worlds of Bearden (1911-88). As part of the Harlem Renaissance, Bearden found his influences in a variety of geographies, cultures, and religions: Harlem and the Caribbean, European and African art, blues and hymns. Fine (exhibition curator, National Gallery) provides a splendid general view of the life and development of the artist's work; essays by a number of outstanding scholars cover more specific areas. Many of the works included have rarely been seen by the public, giving readers a marvelous opportunity to view a wide range of paintings, book illustrations, and costume designs along with the better-known collages, all in finely executed illustrations (224 color, 86 b&w). This important contribution to the history of 20th-century American art is highly recommended.-Paula Frosch, Metropolitan Museum of Art Lib., New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.