Cover image for Omega
Title:
Omega
Author:
McDevitt, Jack.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Ace Books, 2003.
Physical Description:
438 pages : map ; 24 cm
General Note:
Sequel to: The engines of God.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780441010462
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library X Adult Fiction Popular Materials-Science Fiction/Fantasy
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Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Elma Library X Adult Fiction Science Fiction/Fantasy
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Summary

Summary

Now, the writer who gets better with every book delivers a scorching novel of destruction and heroism-on a galactic scale. Hailed as a sweeping novel of suspense and spectacle, Chindi was thought by many to be Jack McDevitt's finest book to date. Now he concludes the story begun almost a decade ago in The Engines of God-as Earth's military and scientific experts band together to save an alien society from a deadly force speeding toward its home planet...


Author Notes

Jack McDevitt (born 1935) is an American science fiction author whose novels frequently deal with attempts to make contact with alien races, and with archaeology or xenoarchaeology.

He attended La Salle University, where a short story of his won the annual Freshman Short Story Contest and was published in the school's literary magazine, Four Quarters. He received a Master's degree in literature from Wesleyan University in 1971. Before becoming a full-time author, he was an English teacher, naval officer, Philadelphia taxi driver, customs officer and motivational trainer.

His first published story was The Emerson Effect in The Twilight Zone Magazine in 1981. Two years later, he published his first novel, The Hercules Text, which won the Philip K. Dick Special Award. He won the 2006 Nebula Award for Best Novel for Seeker, the UPC International Prize for his novella Ships in the Night in 1991, and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best SF novel for Omega in 2003.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

The trilogy McDevitt began with The Engines of God 0 (1994) and continued in Chindi0 BKL Jl 02 concludes in a decisive confrontation with the omega clouds. Semisentient, coherent energy fronts, the clouds obliterate every civilization in their path, and one of them is projected to reach Earth in 900 years. It is much closer to destroying the Korbikkan civilization of humanoid sentients, one of just three other sentient races known to humanity. Can humanity afford to deploy the resources of scientific talent and weapons needed to save another race without putting its own existence at risk? Can a human rescue team save a whole world without letting the inhabitants know they are being saved? As before, McDevitt forges out of ethical dilemmas a plot as gripping as any action fan could want--not that it is lacking in action, hardware, and complex characterization. A felicitous concoction that rather recalls Gregory Benford's and David Brin's stuff, and surely will please their fans as well as McDevitt's. --Roland Green Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Having mastered the big, sprawling adventure stories called space opera in books like Chindi, McDevitt extends the form in this feel-good SF novel that earns its hopeful conclusion. Priscilla "Hutch" Hutchens, heroine of several of McDevitt's previous novels, has had a full career as a space pilot and is now administrator of the government agency in charge of space research. Like most people, she's only mildly concerned with the long-range threat of the omega clouds, masses of energy floating through the universe that detect and pulverize artificial structures (and the intelligent creatures that live in them). After all, the cloud headed for Earth is 900 years away. This situation changes when a charmingly innocent young alien race is discovered just a few months before a cloud will obliterate it. Hutch has to juggle resources to save the cute creatures, at the same concealing the human intervention in order not to disrupt the alien civilization's development. The cloud's implacable threat keeps the action tightly focused, though the story shifts viewpoint frequently to show crowds of people committing themselves to different aspects of the mission. Part of the rescue effort involves spaceships and gadgets, but the most serious part depends on human intelligence and passion. McDevitt is very good at imagining strange challenges-and at picturing humans coping when things don't work out as planned. His characters succeed in imposing their compassion on the void. (Nov. 4) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

The discovery of the omega cloud phenomenon-cloudlike waves of energy that destroy entire civilizations-has put Earth on alert. When the cloud heading toward it veers toward a planet populated by a primitive alien species, a few concerned individuals, including a research scientist and a former space pilot, travel to that world in a desperate attempt to save it and, in so doing, discover a way to save their home planet. McDevitt excels in combining hard science, gripping adventure, and engaging characters into a story rich in detail and filled with action. Set in the same far future as Chindi and Deepsix, this taut tale of sf suspense belongs in most collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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