Cover image for The encyclopedia of autoimmune diseases
Title:
The encyclopedia of autoimmune diseases
Author:
Cassell, Dana K.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Facts On File, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xviii, 364 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780816043408
Format :
Book

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RC600 .C37 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association estimates that one in five Americans, or 50 million people, suffer from autoimmune diseases. An autoimmune disease results when cells and other components of the body's immune system, designed to protect us from invading microbes such as bacteria or viruses, mistakenly attack a person's own organs. These diseases run the gamut from mild to potentially life-threatening, and include chronic fatigue syndrome, hepatitis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatold arthritis, and many others. The Encyclopedia of autoimmune Diseases is the only reference of its kind available to general readers. This comprehensive A-to-Z resource covers the human immune system and what happens when it malfunctions, including details on a wide range of autoimmune diseases, the latest information on treatments, and suggestions on how to cope with them. Several appendixes list common medications used for treatment; organizations offering advocacy, support, and information; related web-sites; and government agencies, More than 300 cross-referenced entries include autoimmunity, bone marrow, cellular immunity (cell-mediated immunity), DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), fungi, genetic engineering, graft-versus-host disease, leukocytes, mast cells, natural killer (NK) cell, platelets, stem cells, transplant rejection, vaccine, and virus.


Author Notes

Dana K. Cassell is a freelance writer and editor who has published over 1,000 articles in more than 150 periodicals. She lives in New Hampshire.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

The newest addition to the Facts On File Library of Health and Living series is The Encyclopedia of Autoimmune Diseases. Like others in the series, it is a stand-alone reference. With "nearly 100 autoimmune diseases . . . affecting up to 22 million Americans--8 percent of the population," this book is appropriate for both general readers and professionals. More than 300 A-Z entries, voluminous appendixes, and bibliography will guide readers in their search for information. Entries cover terminology, key physicians and researchers, and specific diseases. Specific disease articles contain a historical and general introduction with subsections on causes, clinical features, diagnosis, complications, treatment (drug and nondrug), and other readings. A separate entry on research on the disease follows, where appropriate. Articles on ethnic, age-related, and other specific factors are included (for example, African Americans with autoimmune diseases, Environment and autoimmune disease). Familiar conditions such as allergies, AIDS, diabetes, and hepatitis are found along with less well-known diseases such as Evans' syndrome or ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP). Appendixes list autoimmune diseases, diseases listed by target organs, organizations and help groups, patient research registries, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) investment in research on autoimmune diseases, among others topics. An extensive bibliography and index round out the encyclopedia. Highly recommended for the academic and public library collection, this book gives unbiased medical information for the general public as well as the family and friends of a disease sufferer. -- RBB Copyright 2003 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Approximately 22 million Americans have an autoimmune disease (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis and lupus). For some reason, their immune systems, designed to protect them from invading microorganisms and foreign bodies, attack their own tissues. The symptoms are common, so physicians often have trouble diagnosing them. Freelance medical writer Cassell (The Encyclopedia of Obesity and Eating Disorders) and Rose (director, Johns Hopkins Ctr. for Autoimmune Disease Research) cover approximately 100 of these mysterious illnesses in clear language. Each entry includes a description and information about the condition's prevalence, seriousness, demographics, clinical presentation, complications, and treatment; where appropriate, a separate entry about research follows. A series of appendixes lists diseases alphabetically and by target organs, organizations, sources for medical alert jewelry, web sites, commonly used medications for treating rheumatoid arthritis, patient research registries, and information about research at the National Institutes of Health. Though their title doesn't reflect it, the authors also address the various parts of the immune system (lymph nodes, bone marrow), relevant anatomy and physiology (inflammation, phagocytosis), demographics (Native Americans with autoimmune disease), organizations (American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association), and other diseases affecting the immune system (AIDS, chronic fatigue syndrome). General medical references (e.g., The Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, 2d ed.) cover individual diseases, and readers looking for more depth will need to consult the professional literature. In general, however, this volume is a welcome addition to public, school, and consumer health libraries because it brings everything together in one place.-Barbara M. Bibel, Oakland P.L. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Since AIDS is the leading cause of death in Americans aged 25 to 44 and childhood asthma affects an estimated five million American children, autoimmune diseases are a major concern in health care today. Freelance author Cassell teams with Rose (John Hopkins Univ., Center for Autoimmune Disease Research) to produce a timely resource about autoimmune diseases. The entries are unsigned, but many supply references. An enormous bibliography is organized alphabetically by disease, and useful appendixes feature organizations, help groups, Web sites, common medications, and patient research registries. Since the text, intended for consumers and undergraduates, focuses on the diseases instead of the broader discipline of immunology, this work lacks the depth of Encyclopedia of Immunology, ed. by Peter J. Delves and Ivan M. Roitt (2nd ed., 4v., CH, Mar'99), but provides greater detail on specific autoimmune diseases than A Dictionary of Immunology by W.J. Herbert et al. (4th ed., 1995) or Julius M. Cruse and Robert E. Lewis's Illustrated Dictionary of Immunology (2nd ed., CH, Dec'02). ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Community college, undergraduate, and secondary school libraries, and health collections in public libraries. L. M. McMain Sam Houston State University


Excerpts

Excerpts

The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association estimates that one in five Americans, or 50 million people, suffer from autoimmune diseases. An autoimmune disease results when cells and other components of the body's immune system, designed to protect us from invading microbes such as bacteria or viruses, mistakenly attack a person's own organs. These diseases run the gamut from mild to potentially life-threatening, and include chronic fatigue syndrome, hepatitis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and many others. The Encyclopedia of Autoimmune Diseases is the only reference of its kind available to general readers. This comprehensive A-to-Z resource covers the human immune system and what happens when it malfunctions, including details on a wide range of autoimmune diseases, the latest information on treatments, and suggestions on how to cope with them. Several appendixes list common medications used for treatment; organizations offering advocacy, support, and information; related Web sites; and government agencies. More than 300 cross-referenced entries include autoimmunity, bone marrow, cellular immunity (cell-mediated immunity), DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), fungi, genetic engineering, graft-versus-host disease, leukocytes, mast cells, natural killer (NK) cell, platelets, stem cells, transplant rejection, vaccine, and virus. Excerpted from The Encyclopedia of Autoimmune Diseases by Dana K. Cassell, Noel R. Rose All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. xv
Entries A-Zp. 1
Appendixesp. 257
Bibliographyp. 307
Indexp. 345