Cover image for The worst is over : what to say when every moment counts
Title:
The worst is over : what to say when every moment counts
Author:
Acosta, Judith.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Jodere Group, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xxi, 323 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781588720238

9781588720245
Format :
Book

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RC489.M53 A26 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Acosta and Prager present an in-depth guide to a revolutionary method of using the power of words to promote healing in emergency situations. The principles involved in using language to connect with the body and spirit for healing apply anywhere, everywhere, whenever sensitivity, understanding, kindness, and conviction are required.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

What does one say to an injured person after calling 911? According to therapist/crisis counselor Acosta and therapist/consultant Prager, the magic words are "the worst is over." Then one continues to administer what the authors call "Verbal First Aid" soothing words that will promote psychic and medical healing, even before the ambulance arrives. Verbal First Aid, say the authors, arose from the needs of crisis and rescue personnel, to whom they have taught their technique, and was designed to complement medical care. Offered here are sample scripts for a wide variety of situations for various populations (e.g., children) and emergencies (e.g., car crashes, bleeding, panic attacks, and childbirth). They also offer techniques such as guided imagery to deal with nonemergency situations like chronic illness, as well as suggestions for self-care for both professional and nonprofessional caregivers. Though there is an extensive bibliography, many statements are presented without references to medical studies. The authors frequently refer to their web site, www.theworstisover.com, as a source of more information; however, at press time, it was little more than a site from which to sell the book. Large public libraries may want to purchase for self-help collections; otherwise, buy where interest warrants. Martha E. Stone, Treadwell Lib., Boston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.